Grazia (גרציה) – Grazia! (1978)

Koliphone Cover

Koliphone Cover

Israel. Jaffa in the late ’60s and early ’70s had an exciting and exotic sound to offer, where folk musicians performed live at its taverns seven nights a week. It was far from the mainstream hit-parade of swinging Tel-Aviv but close enough geographically to attract listeners from across the Tel-Aviv / Jaffa metropolis. The scene got bigger and wilder, as it embraced the Middle Eastern celebration style known as Hafla, involving heavy drinking, local food, and music of course.

Standing at the center of old Jaffa and its vibrant music scene was the record store and label, Koliphone Records. Owned by the Azoulay brothers, Koliphone tirelessly recorded these artists and sold their records to the growing masses. At first, they released mostly Greek and Turkish music, shortly followed by Yemenite, Moroccan and Hebrew records, showcasing the cultural melting pot of this ancient town.

Pradisiac Jaffa

Paradisiac Jaffa

The biggest and most influential artist of the time was Aris San. A singer and guitar virtuoso, San created the Israeli-Greek style and introduced the drums-bass-guitar rock combo to folk audiences. His fans thought they were listening to traditional bouzouki melodies, but in fact, San’s music was a lot heavier, strongly influenced by American surf, verging on the psychedelic. San’s huge popularity attracted many other artists to record the new style he had pioneered. Artists such as Trifonas, Levitros, Nino Nikolaidis and many more began to appear on Jaffa’s record stands. Among them was a young girl who sang in Turkish. Her name was Grazia Peretz (גרציה פרץ)!

Grazia was a wonder kid in the early ’70s. She started singing at the age of nine, performing at Turkish weddings and Mediterranean nightclubs, sharing a stage with Aris San and Trifonas. Soon, she became an in-demand act for events up and down the country, landing herself a weekly TV spot on the Channel 1 music segment!

Let’s go to our record:

Psych Portrait

Psych Portrait

For her 16th birthday, her father sent her to record a full-length Hafla style album at the Koliphone Studios. Marko Bachar, who was the label’s in-house producer, arranger, and keyboard player, was in charge of the project. Bachar had just sold his organ and bought a monophonic Moog synthesizer. Grazia wanted to break free from the conformities of Greek and Turkish folk music and introduce the early sounds of disco she and her peers were getting so much into.

When the album finally hit the shops it sold… nothing! Hard funk drums, pounding bass coupled with synth blips and psychedelic Turkish guitars, well… it was all a bit too much for the unsuspecting folk audience. At the age of 18, disheartened by the music industry and the undue touring environment she had to endure at such an early age, she stopped singing and never returned to the studio or the stage.

The ‘IM’ highlights unfold us a distinctive tinge from the east, beautifully sang in Turkish, with utmost moogsSoyle Beni, with an eerie sci-fi feel, this Israeli disco prog shows us the kind of sound that people used to dance, back on Jaffa nightclubs. And Rampi Rampi, an upbeat with broken pace, key winds solos, luscious chorus and the usual Arab/oriental scales with its minor harmonics. A Rocky feel at its best!

Chuyến đi Tốt!

Tracks include:

A1 Kemangi

A2 Soyle Beni

A3 Artik Sevmeyegegim

A4 Istemen

A5 Elveda Meyhanec

B1 Rampi Rampi

B2 Muhabbet

B3 Olmek Var

B4 Arkadas

B5 Gidis O Gidisse

Licensed courtesy of Azoulay Brothers.

Recorded in Jaffa, 1978.

Koliphone ‎– 46407

Reissue by ℗ & (C) Fortuna Records 2013.

4 Comments

  1. Steve says:

    This is pure magic.

    Like

  1. […] our last post, we’ll continue in Israel. To show you a little forgotten 45 single, re-released by […]

    Like

  2. […] Grazia: Grazia Peretz recorded her first album as a teenager in the 70s. As a kid, she was involved in the Jaffa folk scene, singing at Turkish weddings and at Mediterranean nightclubs. Grazia recorded the album with Koliphone Records, a label specialising in Greek, Turkish, Yemenite, and Moroccan music. The album combines Turkish music with psychedelia and proggy synths. Only 1,000 copies were pressed at the time of release and it was a flop – kind of forgotten, but reissues have been pressed decades later and the album can be found on Spotify. Sadly, because of the poor sales, Grazia stopped performing by the end of the 70s. Not much else is known about her. More information on her album can be found here. […]

    Like

Leave your Word

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

La Nave Del Rock Argento

foreign lavish sounds

Русская Музыка

foreign lavish sounds

JPOP80SS

foreign lavish sounds

'Girls Of The Golden East' - (Mostly) Seventies Songstresses of the Soviet Satellites

'Girls Of The Golden East' - Female and Female-led Pop Music from the former Eastern Bloc from the late 1960s to the early 1980s

The Day After The Sabbath

foreign lavish sounds

Zepelim

The Inner Reaches of Outsider Radio

Flabbergasted Vibes

foreign lavish sounds

Sangre Yakuza

foreign lavish sounds

Plain and Fancy

foreign lavish sounds

JUGO ROCK FOREVER

foreign lavish sounds

50 Watts

foreign lavish sounds

Meeting in Music

foreign lavish sounds

Deserter's Songs

foreign lavish sounds

Eastern Bloc Songs

Music from Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary and Elsewhere

lady walker

foreign lavish sounds

13

foreign lavish sounds

FLASH STRAP

foreign lavish sounds

Pérolas do Rock'n'Roll

foreign lavish sounds

Cabeza de Moog !

foreign lavish sounds

madrotter-treasure-hunt

foreign lavish sounds

Paleofuture

foreign lavish sounds

BibliOdyssey

foreign lavish sounds

Anatolian Pop Rock Folk Psychedelic 70's

Anatolian Pop Rock Folk Psychedelic 70's

Soviet Groove

foreign lavish sounds

Rockasteria

foreign lavish sounds

Discos con Mucho Polvo

foreign lavish sounds

Órfãos do Loronix

Recuperando o acervo do Loronix

%d bloggers like this: