Grupo Vocal Argentino – Chango Farías Gómez Presenta (1974)

chango farias cópia

Hola Amigos! Today is a special day, after a tour de force by the Middle East, let’s return to Latin America, our motherland and celebrate the memory, talent, and passion from one of the greatest Argentinian musicians: Chango Farías Gomez!

Characterized by his pioneering and innovative spirit in the way of interpreting the folk music roots and especially for being one of the first musicians who introduced polyphony in the Argentine and Latin American folklore. As we have done in other entries, his complete biography and interviews will be shown in future posts, as we intend to deliver MPA (Musicos Populares Argentinos) and La Manija soon.

Sadly, he died on August 24, 2011, following a cardiac arrest. (RIP)

Today we will focus on Argentinian Folklore!

Let’s go to our history:

La Chacarera
La Chacarera

The word folklore was created by the English archaeologist William John Thomas on August 22, 1846, etymologically derived from ‘folk’ (people, breed) and ‘lore’ (knowledge, science). The date coincides, in Argentina, with the birth of Juan Bautista Ambrosetti (1865-1917), recognized as the father of folk science.

Argentinian folk music has a century-long history which has its roots in the original indigenous cultures. Three major historical and cultural events were molding it: Spanish Colonization (XVI-XVIII centuries), European Immigration (1850-1930), and lastly, but no less important the Internal Migration (1930-1980).

El Pericón
El Pericón

Although folklore is just a cultural expression that meets the requirements of being anonymous, popular and traditional, in Argentina folklore or folk music it’s an author known music, inspired by rhythms and distinctive styles of provincial cultures, mostly indigenous and Afro-Hispanic colonial roots.

The projection folk music began to gain popularity in the 30’s and 40’s, coinciding with a large wave of internal migration from the countryside to the city and the provinces to Buenos Aires, to settle in the 50’s, with the boom of folklore, as the main genre of popular music alongside with the Tango!

Tango, La Boca
Tango, La Boca

In the 60’s and 70’s the popularity of Argentine folklore expanded and linked to similar expressions in Latin America, with the help of various musical and lyrical movements of renewal, as the emergence of the genre in major festivals, including the Festival Nacional de Folclore de Cosquín, one of the largest in this field!

After being seriously affected by the cultural repression imposed by the dictatorship installed between 1976-1983, folk music arose from the Falklands War of 1982, although more related to other genres of Argentina and Latin American popular music expressions, like the Tango, the so-called Rock Nacional, El Cuarteto, and Cumbia.

Atahualpa Yupanqui
Atahualpa Yupanqui

The historical evolution of folk music took shape in four major regions in Argentina: Cordoba-Northwest, Cuyo, The Littoral and Pampa-Patagonian Surera, influenced by, and influential in the musical cultures of border countries such as Bolivia, southern Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay.

Atahualpa Yupanqui, Mercedes Sosa, and Andrés Chazarreta are unanimously considered the most important artists in the history of folk music of Argentina.

Let’s go to our album:

The Grupo Vocal Argentino is a folk music group created in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1966, composed by two stages with different integrations: the first between 1966-1970 led by Chango Farías Gómez and the second from 1974 onwards, led by Carlos Marrodán. In the first stage, the group was a quintet characterized by its modern and innovative style in how to interpret the folklore, being considered the best vocal group in the history of the folk music of Argentina. (!)

They recorded two albums, Grupo Vocal Argentino (1966) and Misa Criolla in (1968), the latter considered as one of the best albums from all-time.

In 1970 the group disbanded.

Carlos Alberto Marrodán
Carlos Alberto Marrodán

Simultaneously, in 1973 the musician Carlos Marrodán, an admirer of Chango Farías Gómez work had attempted to enter the GVA, forming an unnamed octet and invited Chango to witness the first results. Chango was so pleased that he offered the use of the name Grupo Vocal Argentino to Morrodán.

With this composition in the following year, he recorded the today’s album with the following formation: Carlos Heredia, Carlos Fanelli, Roberto Maldonado, José Bravo, Adrián Gómez, Eduardo Curetti, Raúl Bissón and Ricardo D’Agostino.

MPA, 1986
MPA, 1986

Chango has a curious statement that sums up everything we’ve seen so far:

‘I had to always struggle with the dichotomy of whether I do or not folklore. Accept the term folklore was one of the many misfortunes that befall us as a people at the cultural level. I always found that word shifted the concept of evolution possible in our music. All of our historical problems of whether or not this is the folklore was settling in musical terms. So I built the Huanca Huá, which was the foundation stone for the vocal groups were seen, over time, as natural within the genre. In the MPA I got with modern codes that arise in the world and proved that you can keep playing ours. With La Manija showed the excellence of the popular’

The ‘IM’ highlights are Debajo de la Morera and Cholita TraidoraBuen Viaje!

Tracks Include:

A1 La Finadita (Francisco Díaz, Julián Antonio Díaz) / Chacarera

A2 Torcaza, Paloma, Torcaza (Roberto Margarido / Angel Ritrovato) / Cancíon

A3 Debajo de la Morera (Virgilio Ramón Carmona) / Zamba

A4 Chacarera Santiagueña (Tradicional) / Chacarera

A5 Coplas Para la Pena (M. Antonia Barros / Carlos Marrodán) / Zamba

B1 Cholita Traidora (Tradicional) / Carnavalito

B2 Zambita del Caminante (Atahualpa Yupanqui) / Zamba

B3 Añorando (Hermanos Simón) / Chacarera

B4 La Tupungatina (Cristino Tapia) / Tonada

B5 Viva Jujuy (Tradicional) / Bailecito

Raúl Bissón, José M. Bravo, Eduardo Curetti, Ricardo D’Agostino

Carlos Fanelli, Adrián Gómez. Carlos Heredia, Roberto Maldonado

Arreglos y Dirección: Carlos Marrodán

Trova XT-80092

El Ateneu, Library
El Ateneu, Library

Moris – Ciudad de Guitarras Callejeras (1974)

cover

Moris’s reputation is mostly based on his participation in the early days of the Argentine rock movement, however, there is no reason to underestimate this fantastic composer, owner of a powerful voice. His amazing lyrics of social and political nature always guided his not as extensive production. Now considered a living legend among many other major artists, we’ll start by its second album, the mythical 30 Minutos de Vida will be left for later, as well as the famous El Oso and Ayer Nomás themes. Welcome to the world of the Elvis Porteño (only in rock n’ roll attitude)!

Let’s go to our history:

Mauricio Birabent born in 9 November 1942, is an undisputed hero from the genesis of Argentine Rock, better known as Moris, an original inhabitant of the legendary Cueva before the first rockers began to meet there. In 1966 Los Beatniks was born in Villa Gesell, Buenos Aires; after a few months playing at Juan Sebastián Bar they recorded in August what is considered the first single of Argentine Rock: Rebelde

Los Beatniks (Inflamable!)
Los Beatniks (Inflammable!)

To promote the song, the band rented a truck and performed live on the streets of Buenos Aires, something unusual for the time! Soon after, by the lack of attention they received, the group disbanded and groups like Manal and La Barra de Chocolate arise. In the same year, he starts his solo career. By 1967, Moris was in TNT studios while Los Gatos were recording, in one of the intervals, he manages to record a couple of tracks, those tapes would serve for the basis of their first album which is published two years later by Mandioca label: 30 Minutos de Vida.

With appearances from Pappo and Claudio Gabis, this was an eclectic album that blended the music he loved best, tango, rock, blues, and jazz. (!)

Live, 1970
Live, 1970

By the end of 1973, Moris published a book of photos, poems and lyrics called Ahora Mismo, subsequently, Talent label reissued his Lp with an extra cut (Juan, El Noble Caballero) and a different fold-out cover. Ciudad de Guitarras Callejeras, was released the following year. For this second album, released in July 1974, Litto Nebbia and Ciro Fogliatta were attended, it contained a theme that later would become a classic: Mi Querido Amigo Pipo, dedicated to journalist Pipo Lernoud. On 13 and 14 September, 1974 Moris starts the official presentation of the Lp in the Astral theater, with Beto Satragni (bass) and Ricardo Santillan (drums).

Primer Galán
Primer Galán

The lack of work, continuity, and fundamentally social and political unrest that Argentina lives in 1975 motivates him to migrate to Spain, where he and Aquelarre demonstrate that it was possible to sing rock in Spanish. Consolidated there, he edits Enrocate and Fiebre de Vivir with which obtained great success.

Briefly, in April 1980, Moris returns to Argentina to present his album and performs three concerts at Obras Stadium. Returning to Spain, Modern World is released.

Moris, 80s
Moris, 80s

Moris returned again on March 21, 1981, to perform and record a live album called Las Obras de Moris. After a few albums released throughout the 80s, his career slowed down, with collections and some unpublished material during the 90s and 2000s. Recently, alongside his son Antonio Birabent, they filled the Auditorium Theatre of Mar del Plata, to release a collaborative album: Familia Canción.

With ten new songs, composed and written by both.

Let’s go to our album:

This was his first album for RCA, who was very reluctant to sign Moris for his constant outbursts but was convinced by Lito Nebbia who also helped Birabent playing bass on most of the disc. Litto was just one of the figures in this album, which also includes another ex-gato, Ciro Fogliatta in piano and Rodolfo Alchourrón in its ubiquitous string arrangements. This is perhaps his most well-produced album, properly dressed as instrumental, more rock and less bleak and raging that previous 30 Minutos de Vida.

Moris & Antonio Birabent
Moris & Antonio Birabent

The ‘IM’ highlights are Rock de Campana, a basic rock n’ roll to envy the most conservative, simply straightforward, with a tight band and beautiful chorus, with lyrics that honor the town of Campana. And El Mendigo de Dock Sud, with a gloomy start, the song develops in a melancholy and exciting way, Moris tells the story of a beggar, his past and secrets over the creek; with lovely harmonies, high-pitch backing vocals and one of the most beautiful endings that have hitherto been presented so far!

Un disco bien porteño de nuestro juglar urbano, राम्रो यात्रा!

Tracks Include:

A1 Mi Querido Amigo Pipo

A2 Rock de Campana

A3 Muchacho Del Taller Y La Oficina

B1 El Mendigo de Dock Sud

B2 Tengo 40 Millones

B3 A Veces Estoy Cansado

B4 Cabalgando Por El Campo

B5 Si Te Tocaran El Timbre

B6 De Aquí Adonde Iré

RCA Vik ‎– LZ1264

Guitar, Vocals – Moris

Piano – Ciro Fogliatta / Daniel Russo (De Aquí Adonde Iré)

Drums – Ricardo Santillán

Bass – Daniel Russo / Litto Nebbia (De Aquí Adonde Iré)

Chorus – Victor Gomez, Rubén Parra, Moris

Guests

Drums – Corre López (Si Te Tocaran El Timbre, A Veces Estoy Cansado)

Bass – Ricardo Jelicie (Idem)

Tumbadora – Lalo Fransen

Arrangements – Moris

String Arrangement – Rodolfo Alchourrón

Produced by – Horacio ‘Gordo’ Martinez

Rio Paraná, Extension
Rio Paraná, Extension

Bubu – Anabelas (1978)

cover

Argentina, as in many other Latin American countries, had a turbulent political context over the 60’s/70’s. With the first coup in 1966, the new junta constantly exchange its presidents, closes the Congress and extinguishes all political parties, trade, and student unions. Due to this regress, massive popular demonstrations such as the Cordobazo/Rosariazo denounced the bad situation of life and lack of rights.

It didn’t take long for urban guerrillas like ERP and the Montoneros arose and began its murders and demands. Amid this turbulence, in 1973, Juan Domingo Perón (Argentina’s most important political figure) returns from an exile of 18 years, being received by millions of people at the Ezeiza airport.

During the occasion, extreme right-wing snipers kill more than 18 people and injure hundreds, in the event that became known as the Ezeiza massacre. (!)

El Cordobazo
El Cordobazo

With his death in 1974, the situation between the left and right parties intensifies, the junta creates the Argentine Anticommunist Alliance (death squad), that along with the Operation Independence stopped a guerrilla attempt to capture and secede the territories of Tucumán. Chaos reigned through the country and the military made a last coup d’état, on 24 March 1976. The military government led by Jorge R. Videla, started one of the bloodiest regimes from the Southern Cone, marked by repression, censorship and (innumerable) disappearances (sic); it also implemented coercive measures in the political, economic and cultural spheres.

Videla & The Junta
Videla & The Junta

Among these was: the hardness of employers over their employees, cultural restrictions such as the prohibition of certain songs and musicians of national and international acts, authoritarian power against the Peronist model, common workers, guerrillas, trade unionists, and intellectuals. Under this dictatorship, youth should belong to a line responsible and committed with patriotism as well as the western lifestyle and Christianity. By contrast, the rock of ’60s had outlined a rebellious young man, with long hair, beard and hippie ideology (free of dogmas).

Perón
Perón

The world in those years lived immersed in a post McCarthyism witch hunt, reflected in the military panorama that was installed throughout Latin America. These functioned as referees control amid the Cold War between East and West.

The Argentine rock, like society as a whole, suffered greater censorship during this period, seen as subversive by the military, in a speech of 1976 Admiral Massera denounced rock musicians and their fans as potential subversives! In the eye of the hurricane, the mid-70s saw the folk and pure rock n’ roll groups lose strength to a new and complex sound: the progressive and symphonic rock. (!)

Bands like Crucis, Espiritu, Contraluz, Alas, El Reloj, La Máquina de Hacer Pájaros and (lastly) Serú Girán inaugurated a new era for Argentine Rock.

Montoneros Symbol
Montoneros Symbol

The rebellious lyrics and criticism of the society through metaphorical and explicit pamphlets relating to love, drugs, and imaginary heroes have been set aside, for unusual concepts and aesthetics that constantly annoyed the regime.

Let’s go to our history:

Bubu was originally formed in 1973 and led by Miguel Zavaleta (singer), characterized by its musical and theatrical proposal, whose tendency is assimilated with progressive or symphonic music of the time. They began performing in public under the name of Sion and debuted in theater Del Globo in 1976, marked by its freshness, joy, and staging. After a series of successful concerts, the band started to record their debut album, but now without the participation of Zavaleta, resulting in difficulties at the beginning, which were overcome by incorporating Patty Guelache.

Bubu Gang
Bubu Gang

Concluding the conceptual work in 1978, with the name of Anabelas, heavily influenced by King Crimson, the band had to wait a few more months until the album release. With the Lp on the streets, the group decides to separate.

Let’s go to our album:

A few months ago when I heard the album for the first time, I could not fail to impress me and ask myself: why i haven’t known this before?! I must confess I’m not a proghead, my favorite acts from Argentine Prog are Serú Girán and La Máquina, but even here we do not notice any resemblance to these bands.

The band touches across many different styles yet imitates no one! The King Crimson influence is mostly through the guitar of Eduardo Rogatti which is Fripp-like in many places and is the closest this band comes to imitation. As Bubu performs driving marches with dramatic vocals and Wagnerian intensity, you can also hear shades of the Canterbury scene from Henry Cow to Soft Machine and Stravinsky!

Argentine Prog Ensemble
Argentine Prog Ensemble

Debuting with only 3 songs, an avant-garde initiative for the standards of the time, once more I won’t highlight any track. Like many other conceptual albums, the whole is more important than an excerpt. Bubu is a band to challenge your listening skills and is a great place to start to get into the more adventurous styles of prog rock.

Nzuri Safari!

Tracks Include:

A1 El Cortejo de Un Día Amarillo (Danza de Las Atlantides / Locomotora Blues)

B1 El Viaje de Anabelas

B2 Sueños de Maniquí

Credits

  • Bass, Effects: Edgardo ‘Fleke’ Folino
  • Drums, Percussion: Edurado ‘Polo’ Corbella
  • Flute (Piccolo, Bass Flute): Cecilia Tenconi
  • Guest, Piano: Mario Kirlis
  • Guitar, Effects: Eduardo Rogatti
  • Lead Vocals: Petty Guelache
  • Chorus: Cecilia XZ, Golo, Manzana, Maqui, Marcelius ‘El Potente’, Voulet
  • Tenor Saxophone: Win Fortsman
  • Violin: Sergio Polizzi
  • Lyrics by: Win Forstman
  • Music, Arrangements by: Daniel Andreoli
  • Sleeve design by: Carlos Felipe Fernández

Notes

‘Así continuó Anabelas su cósmico desplazarse en espiral por los espacios vacíos del sueño. Ondulando entre lo que podríamos decir la conciencia propia y las intersecciones de una realidad que cada tanto la ve aparecer en la fluorescencia de las piedras, en la perfección quimérica de las estructuras móviles del abrazo, o entre silencios que le son absolutamente propios.’

Recorded between March and October of 1978

EMI ‎– 8574

Buenos Aires Overview
Buenos Aires Overview

Pot Zenda – Single (1970)

pot zenda - capa

Today’s post will have minor text info, quite because our friends from A Estos Hombres Tristes already made a small dossier about the artist, sadly, there’s no information about him on the net, too, let’s check it!

Let’s go to their history:

Argentina. We’ll have to go back in time, more specifically the late 50’s. Taking advantage of the explosion of Rock and Roll captained by Elvis Presley and its clones, RCA Argentina decided to start a fierce commercial strategy, beyond comparison of what was being made so far. With biweekly public concerts, dozens of Lp’s, frequent television shows and whole manufacture of new young idols, La Nueva Ola was born like that. Their Castellano versions of great American classics foresaw the pop mass consumption of these artists. Were part of this first cast, names like Chico Novarro, Palito Ortega, Violeta Rivas, Johnny Tedesco, Nicky Jones, amongst many others.

El Club del Clan
El Club del Clan

With the imminent success of the show, RCA and Channel 13 (El Trece) signed a contract to broadcast a weekly musical program, geared to a young audience, called El Club del Clan. It was aired for the first time on November 10, 1962. Starring a group of ‘friends’ where each artist represented a stereotypical character that corresponded to a musical genre, like Romantic, Tango, Twist, Bolero, Cumbia. A large second cast was formed this time and between them, there was a young Perico Gómez. The only Afro-American in the Clan used to wear a galley hat and always singed the Cumbia (solo or with duets); during the program, the protagonists talked about everyday situations and humorous sketches happened amid the presentations.

There’s a curious fact about it, because the same thing occurred in Brazil a bit later, on 1965, Jovem Guarda started its broadcast and with the same commercial musical proposal, launched artists like Roberto and Erasmo Carlos, Wanderléa and a whole bunch of teen idols that suddenly had TV programs, singles, albums, line clothes, action figures and a myriad of products for sale!

Jovem Guarda
Jovem Guarda

After one year on air, with more than three albums released, its national audience reached inedited peaks: scenes of collective hysteria were common in fashionable clubs, vying for the presence of his characters and certain profit. In 1964 the program already showed some attrition, and with the attendance of some participants to another channel (and program), the Club was canceled at the end of the year. The definitive entry of Beatlemania worldwide and in Argentina, helped the program losing ground amongst its fans eager for another product to consume.

In the late ’60s, Alfredo Aldo Céspedes, would change its name and style once again. The harmless and smiling Perico Gómez gives place to a more serious and mature Pot Zenda. Regarding this time, his name appears in the list of acknowledgments on the first Almendra Lp, he also collaborated with the band during the recordings. On its short career, he recorded three singles in diverse labels, participated in the Argentine version of Hair and after 1973 moved to Venezuela. There, he played throughout the country and died in an automobile accident in March 1988. His remains were then, taken to Buenos Aires where it received a grave. (RIP)

Club Clan Promos
Club Clan Promos

Let’s go to our album:

One year after changing its name, Pot Zenda entered at T.N.T. studios, in early 1970, accompanied by Edelmiro Molinari to record his first single, since the Club Clan era. Once again, Mandioca label is responsible for all production and distribution, the two songs appeared on the famous compilation Pidamos Peras a Mandioca released on the same year. He also participated in November at the Barrock festival.

With some horn attacks on the arrangements, Basta de Llorar, has its rock-soul pace with a great vocal performance and Edelmiro’s solos showing up; this uptempo song caught me in surprise, the silly beat/garage tender (so common at the time) evolves into a psychedelic bomb! Vuelvo a Sonreir takes us back to the Clan era, with mellow lyrics this romantic chanson got some orchestral tinges too.

As a bonus, I’ve added Heloisa. I have finally discovered where the song came from, a band called Totem from Uruguay, these chicos will appear soon here. Hea Teekond!

Tracks Include:

A1 Basta de Llorar

B1 Vuelvo a Sonreir

Bonus: Heloisa

Label – Mandioca MS-013

All songs and lyrics by: Alfredo Céspedes (Pot Zenda)

Companies

  • Recorded At: Estudios T.N.T.

Credits

  • Producer: Edelmiro Molinari
Club Clan Reunited
Club Clan Reunited

Alma y Vida – Alma y Vida (1971)

Capa

Argentina. Today’s album got a minor size text, compared to previous posts, because our friends from Cabeza de Moog already made a dossier about Alma y Vida, don’t forget to check it, as the whole blog as well!

On mid’s ’60s, Carlos Mellino had been, along with Alejandro Medina, future bassist from Manal, a member from The Seasons, one of the first beat bands from Argentina. Gradually, he was contacting with jazz musicians, meeting the trumpeter, Salvador, and the guitarist Barrueco. Soon after, as an arranger and musician, he was leading the band for Leonardo Favio, a national star. Bernardo Baraj recalls his entrance on the future band as a so-called millionaire football transference:

‘I was playing with Sandro and the rivalry at the time between Sandro / Favio, was like Boca / River; actually, its was a change, Ricardo Lew went with Sandro and I passed to Favio’s group. I remember when Leonardo finished singing, we always kept it playing, a non-stop thing, you know? The band sounded so tuned that when Favio really quite, we became an independent group. Thus was born Alma y Vida‘.

Leonardo Favio: Singer, Composer, Actor & Director
Leonardo Favio: Singer, Composer, Actor & Director

Let’s go to their history:

In 1970, Leonardo Favio told them he would stop singing for a while, instead of separating they choose to build your own project, beginning to play under its own name, under a jazz-rock influence. Their first public performances took place in the cycle of Opera Theatre of Buenos Aires, sharing the stage with no less than Manal, Arco Iris, and Vox Dei, on every-Sunday mornings. (!)

Salvador: ‘We always were the first ones to play and people used to whistle, we actually heard some buzz in the very beginning, because see and hear a saxophone and a trumpet at the time was very rare. However, amidst the whistles, some part of the audience stood up and yelled to another, Shut up, deaf!’

Mellino: ‘Imposing a formation with so many kinds and totally different styles, adapting it to our reality was a terrible challenge. We were out of the acoustic or drums, bass, guitar formula, add it that we behave well and were good professionals.’

1971
1971

The impact of these performances leads them to record a single with the legendary short-lived label Mandioca (we’ll have a dedicated post for it), with the songs Niño Color Cariño and He Comprendido. The participations on the mega festival B.A. Rock prompted them to record the first plate in 1971 for RCA Argentina. Shortly before, Mario Salvador left the group and was replaced by Gustavo Moretto. In its first studio album, classics like Mujer, Gracias Por Tu Llanto and Hace Tiempo achieved regular success. With Moretto’s entry, Alma y Vida found their best form among all audiences, not only Argentine Rock gigs and crowds. Thereby establishing itself as a regular entertainer in the mythical La Cueva on Pueyrredón Avenue.

Based on a solid live performance and creativity for hits, such as, Hoy Te Queremos Cantar and later Del Gemido de un Gorrion present on their second (Volumen II), and third (Del Gemido…) albums (respectively), the band reaches its pinnacle on musical charts, playing throughout the country, Uruguai and TV appearances.

Nowdays
Nowadays

In late 1974, Gustavo Moretto leaves the band to move into more complex music, he founds the prog trio, Alas. His departure accelerated a process of internal crisis, that not even the entrance of Osvaldo Lacunza couldn’t save. In 1975 Alma y Vida recorded its fifth and last Lp (Vol. 5), after a year the group finally broke up.

Let’s go to our album:

This is without any doubt an underestimated band, practically unknown outside Argentina, this superb super-group became certainly one of my personal faves, aside Spinetta, Serú Girán, Arco Iris, Fito Páez, etc. Firstly, there is no comparison to any other rock acts in the ’70s, compared to Argentina and Brazil, for instance, their spectacular jazzy sound, outstanding (!!) Mellino’s voice and lyrics that alternate on beautiful poetic love themes or social/political criticism, are a welcomed surprise.

The band completely leaves the commonplace psych-folk, prog or blues that was being made at the time, such as La Pesada, Pappo’s Blues, Sui Generis, Manal, Color Humano, Los Gatos, etc. Although Alma y Vida had never been an instrumental jazz band only! Inspired by Blood, Sweat and Tears and Chicago, the had the vision to introduce new aesthetics, solos, and colors to Argentine Rock.

Carlos Mellino
Carlos Mellino

Mellino: ‘We had a very large range because all came from different extractions, Bernardo and Juan were jazzists, Carlos a rock musician, Mario a scholar one, and I a Beatlemaniac. A mixed salad that made Alma y Vida a well-defined group.’

The ‘IM’ highlights are Mujer Gracias Por Tu Llanto, a ravishing sentimental ballad with melodic horn, smooth pace, reeds and some outstanding dramatic vocals from Carlos Mellino, creating a unique atmosphere. A statement about love and solitude for any woman! And: Realidad de Sentir, with a crazy drum solo intro, this jazzy uptempo, invites us to enter in another reality, with metaphysical lyrics about our human senses, god, nature and the universe. There are some woodwind attacks and this exciting melodic vein that are responsible for an album hard-to-describe.

A truly original approach, you do not want to miss this journey, Buen Viaje!

Tracks Include:

A1 Mujer Gracias Por Tu Llanto (Bernardo Baraj, Carlos Mellino, Ricardo Lew)

A2 Me Siento Dueño del Mundo (Bernardo Baraj, Carlos Mellino, Juan Barrueco)

A3 Hace Tiempo (Bernardo Baraj, Carlos Mellino)

A4 Realidad de Sentir (Bernardo Baraj, Carlos Mellino)

A5 La Morada (Gustavo Moretto)

B1 Veinte Monedas (Carlos Mellino, Esteban Mellino, Gustavo Moretto, Juan Barrueco)

B2 Lagrima de Ciudad (Carlos Mellino, Esteban Mellino)

B3 Y Esto? (Gustavo Moretto, Juan Barrueco)

B4 La Gran Sociedad (Bernardo Baraj, Carlos Mellino)

Credits

Alberto Hualde: drums

Bernardo Baraj: sax

Carlos Mellino: keyboards and voice

Carlos Villalba: bass

Juan Barrueco: guitar

Mario Salvador: trumpet

RCA Vik LZP-1196