Shahram and Shohreh ‎– Telésm (1984)

Okay, let’s go back in time a little bit and recall one of the all-time favs of the ‘IM’, the stunning Ramesh. We’re proud to visit Iran again, but first off, let me remember you to always check the COMMENTS section at every entry to listen to what is referred, in the end, all that matters is the music my dearest matelots stellaires, so do not miss.

This fantastic treasury includes two of one of the mighty artists Iran has ever brought to us, to be sincere, there’s a TON of talent that flourished throughout the country before the 1979 Revolution. Gradually we will enclose most of them and for that, we will stick only with the girl today, the all-time legend Shohreh Solati. Her partner Shahram Shabpareh, simply regarded as the father of pop music in Iran, soon will also be here.

Before we start one last thing, today’s album is exclusive, so please enjoy (only) with us!

Let’s go to our artist:

Shohreh & Shahram Solati (her brother) – 70s

Shohreh Solati  (Persian: شهره صولتی) (born Fatemah Solati on January 4, 1957, in Sar-Cheshmeh) in Tehran to a well-to-do family of artists and entertainers, she developed an interest in music early on, singing at seven years of age. She later went on to study at the Tehran Conservatory of Music, where she received training in singing and the clarinet.

Her first album titled Dokhtar-e-Mashreghi (Persian for “Eastern Girl”) was successfully released in 1976 (even before she already had released a couple of singles), garnering a lot of notability, also, magazines directed toward the youth of Iran in the 1970s gave a ton of exposure to the singer. In a short period, she entered the hall of the Iranian celebs.

Cinema Stars

Shortly before the Revolution, Shohreh left Iran to perform in a series of concerts in the US and, due to restrictions imposed on entertainers by the new leadership, she wasn’t able to return. She moved to Los Angeles in 1982, settling with the exiled Iranian music industry performers of the 70s. Working with songwriters, composers, and arrangers such as Mohammed Moqadam, Jaklin, Siavash Ghomeishi, and Shubert Avakian, she produced, performed and released several new albums in an almost four-decade span.

Zan-e Rooz Magazine – Dream Team Singers

At the turn of the millennium, Shohreh continued releasing more albums outreaching her popularity beyond the borders of Iran. She has been credited to have given sold-out performances in the US, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Netherlands, Italy, Britain, Sweden, France, Switzerland, Germany, Cyprus, Turkey, Israel and beyond. (!)

She has had one of the most consistently active and prolific careers among contemporary, women Iranian singers who still remain. Having received recognition for her ability to continuously reinvent herself as well. Sometimes called the Iranian Madonna, Shohreh also has been referred to as the Queen of Scene, for her attention-grabbing music videos and stage presence, as well as the (majestic) Queen of Iranian Pop آیا کافی است؟

Actress Irene Zazians

Let’s go to our album:

This second album of her career, in addition to being divided side by side with Shahram, has the special collaboration of Manuchehr Cheshmazer in the arrangements, it also has plenty of excellent American musicians in the backing band, giving a unique touch.

Tehran’s feast winds blow here with an unusual eastern feel between folklore, disco, rock and more. Manoochehr’s keys are truly hypnotic, allow yourself to get into that!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Telésm and Gomshodeh.

Tracks Include:

A1 Telésm
A2 Boro
A3 Rosva
A4 Mitoony
B1 Ghesmat
B2 Chera Rafti
B3 Adat (New Version of Hamvatan)
B4 Gomshodeh

Musicians

Keyboards: Manoochehr Cheshmazar
Guitar: Ardeshir Farah
Bass: Jerry Wats
Drums: Alfredo Reyes, Evan Caplan
Percussion: Shahram Shabpareh, Al Chak, Manouchehr Lashkari
Tonbak: Majeed Ghorbanian
Trumpets: Howie Shear, Rick Page
Tenor Sax: Bob Shepard
Trombone: Doug Wintz, David Stout
Viola: George Hunt, Nina Roma
Violins: Rony Barg, Mihel Moro, Tom Shanon, Edward B. Bone

Arranged By: Manoochehr Cheshmazar

Credits

Recorded & Mixed: Hit City West, LA, CA
Engineered By: Jason Bell
Photo: Orad Azarbeygui
Producers: Djahanguir Tabariai, Vartan Avanessian

Notes

Taraneh ‎– 125
Taraneh Enterprises INC. 1984 U.S.A.

Actual Shohreh Solati

Ramesh (رامش) – Ramesh (2013)

capa cópia

The 1953 Iranian coup d’état, known in Iran as the 28 Mordad Coup, was the overthrow of the first democratically elected Prime Minister of Iran Mohammad Mosaddegh on 19 August 1953, orchestrated by the United Kingdom’s MI6 (Operation Boot) and the United States’s CIA (TPAJAX Project).

Mossadegh had sought to audit the books of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (AIOC), a British corporation (now BP) and to renegotiate the terms of the company’s access to Iranian oil reserves. Upon refusal of the AIOC to cooperate with the Iranian government, the parliament (Majlis) voted to nationalize the assets of the company and then, expel their representatives from the country. (!)

The Military Junta Awaits exiled Mohammad Reza Shah, 1953
The Military Junta awaits Mohammad Reza Shah, 1953

Following the coup, a military government under General Fazlollah Zahedi was formed which allowed exiled dictator Mohammad-Rezā Shāh Pahlavi, the Shah of Iran (Iranian king), to effectively rule the country as an absolute monarch.

By the ’70s, there was growing unrest with the Shah’s autocratic and repressive government along with its infamous police: the SAVAK. In January 1978 the first major demonstrations against the Shah occurred. After a year of strikes, clashes and millions of people on the streets, the country, and its economy were paralyzed.

1979 Revolution
1979 Revolution

The Shah fled Iran in January 1979, then Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned from exile to Tehran to establish the Islamic Republic, becoming the supreme leader.

Let’s go to our artist:

The golden age of Iranian pop music took place on a westernized and liberal Tehran of the ’60s and ’70s. This market offered an unprecedented way of artists for all tastes, the classically-trained Ramesh Azar Mohebbi (November 13, 1946) was part of it.

Playing the serious, quiet marquess in contrast to Googoosh’s languorous pop princess, both singers made the papers every time they changed their haircuts and appeared on TV frequently. Ramesh’s appearance though was not as gay and colorful as the blond-haired and joyfully dancing singer-actress mate!

Iranian Singers (Ramesh, Aref)
Ramesh, Giti, Aref,?

Ramesh appeared dark-haired, with stiffer hairstyles, always with a certain distance, never showing much of her emotions, except a somewhat melancholy of silence.

Belying what Light in the Attic promo-release says about the artist, Ramesh isn’t dead! Iranian Wiki, Youtube (!) and some musical blogs deny the fact. Its last song recording ‘Rumi’ (and album?) comes from 2003. Nowadays, she retired from the music business and glamorous spots to devote (only) to its family and daughter. (!)

Let’s go to our album:

I must admit, I’m very thrilled by the artist of today, this compilation by Pharaway Sounds is arguably one of the best, presenting us with a very rich scene that was the Iranian pre-revolution period. Other singers will be debuting here soon, ok?!

Ramesh & Aref
Ramesh & Aref

A funky queen whose rich voice sits like a mink coat, twirling its a melancholy way around long-necked lutes, sleazy Western brass, strings, synths and goblet drums. Luckily, the collection of videos with her ​​performances on TV programs and Festivals are vast! You can appreciate them at the following links, check it out!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Mondanam Az Bodanet and Aroose Noghreh Poosh.

بن سفر!

Tracks Include:

A1 Nago Na

A2 Goftehgoye Sabz

A3 Zoj

A4 Mondanam Az Bodanet w/ Fereidoon Farrokhzad

A5 Roodkhoneha

A6 Sharm-E Boos-E

B1 Afsoos

B2 Aroose Noghreh Poosh

B3 Asmaar Asmaar

B4 Delakam

B5 Labe Daryaa

B6 Ghoroobaa Ghashangan

Pharaway Sounds ‎– PHS009

Vakil Mosque
Vakil Mosque