Slađana Milošević and Neutral Design – Neutralni Design (1983)

All right, continuing with the aforementioned Top 5 records (since our departure) this one also fits in this relation, a very very sick New Wave entry with a talented and flamboyant artist who broke all standards back in the day and still are, either performing, writing, modeling or producing she maintains herself as one of the greatest personas of former SFR Yugoslavia, Serbia and even expanding her horizons all over Europe and America.

This is a killer LP, and we will only start off with, so more will come eventually, shall we?

Let’s go to our artist:

Aleksandra “Slađana” Milošević Hagadone (born 1955 October 3 in Belgrade, PR Serbia, FPR Yugoslavia), better known as Slađana Milošević. Her talent for music became very apparent at an early age, so she started education in classical music at the age of five, playing the piano. A few years later, her interest turned to study the violin. Eventually, she embraced rock and the bass guitar performing in school and recording at the age of 15. (!)

Sasha Subota Orchestra – 1976

From then on, her interests had shifted towards various artistic expressions such as acting, playing music and dancing in the fringe theatres and experimental movies. She acted in Belgrade’s Ex Art Theatre, Atelje 212 Theatre and in Academic Kino Club Krsmanović. In 1976, she toured the Soviet Union as a soloist in the Sasha Subota Orchestra, where she had recorded a compilation of World Hits and a single Mikado for Soviet label Melodiya.

Being in constant discordance with the restrictive regime and the media, despite all the efforts, she could not release a solo record in her homeland for many years. Thus, she invests her funds and finally manages to produce and release the first single in 1977.

An Ordinary Gal – 1977

Unexpectedly, it had achieved immediate success hitting No. 1 on the charts. Milošević’s provocative first song “Au, Au” caused many controversial reactions inside the regime. However, her creative potential, persistence, and consistency of ideas had won over. She influenced younger musicians and other less courageous, to follow her bold path.

From then on, every song she had released hit the top of the charts: “Au, Au” (1977), Simpatija” (1978), “Sexy Dama”(1978), then “Amsterdam”, and “Očigledno Nije Mi Svejedno”, off her first and highly-rated LP Gorim Od Želje Da Ubijem Noć from 1979. Milošević’s fame spread throughout the entire region and the surrounding countries. For instance, at midnight, the Hungarian audience celebrated with Alexandra an arrival of the New Year 1979, through her one-hour performance on National TV, Budapest.

Gorim Od Želje Da Ubijem Noć Tour

In 1982, she embarked with her band on a national Yugoslav tour with English rockabilly legends Matchbox. In 1983, she started a band “Neutral Design” in Munich, Germany and released a self-titled album. Musicians in this project collaborated with bands known worldwide such as Santana and Nina Hagen Band. Songs off of this LP were broadcast and sold in West Germany, Sweden, Yugoslavia, and other European countries.

A single “Das Licht von Kairo / Miki, Miki” released in Yugoslavia, became a mega-hit.

Therefore she would only ascend with a myriad of prizes, world tours, and a 1988 LP. Slađana eventually moves on to different countries, expands her professional acting, waning her solo acts in the 90s releasing her last album in 2000, Animal Tested.

Neutral Design Era

Let’s go to our album:

With an incredible variation of rhythms and influences, this is her most mature and lasting album, for a certain period I heard it repeatedly for months, something that grows inside you, a perfect photograph of what was the effervescent beginning of the ’80s.

Being the chameleon she always was, soon Slađana would follow a more Pop direction in ’84 and walk the paths of Jazz on her subsequent album.

Contemporary of Nina Hagen and Bebi Doll in the exotic, provocative and singular aesthetics senses she remains one of the greatest stars of her country and beyond!

1984

The ‘IM’ highlights are Klown I Smrt, a dark-reggae with a wall of synths and Nad Tobom Anđeli Imaju Moć a soothing cyclotomic ballad.

Tracks Include:

A1 Das Licht Von Kairo (Svletla Kaira)
Lyrics By M. Bajagić
Music By, Arranged By P. Labontie

A2 New York
Arranged By S. Milošević
Guitar (Solo) Rudolf Gast
Lyrics By D. Đurić
Music By B. Werber

A3 Hey, Little Boy
Written-By Slađana Milošević

A4 Klovn I Smrt
Arranged By S. Milošević
Lyrics By M. Bajagić
Music By B. Werber

B1 Miki, Miki
Saxophone (Solo) Mića Marković
Written-By Slađana Milošević

B2 Neko Je Tu (Sa Mnom U Sobi)
Arranged By S. Milošević
Lyrics By M. Bajagić
Music By B. Werber

B3 Nad Tobom Anđeli Imaju Moć
Written By Slađana Milošević

B4 Ja Sam Neka Čudna Vrsta
Lyrics By M. Tadić
Music By, Lyrics By, Arranged By S. Milošević

Musicians

Bass: Pit Zaepernick
Drum Programming, Synthesizer (Prophet 5), Organ (Hammond B3): Attila Terry
Guitar, Drum Programming, Effects: Bruce Werber
Producer, Vocals, Guitar, Drum Programming, Effects: Alexandra Sladjana M.
Synthesizer (Roland V, Yamaha): Alex Grunwald
Synthesizer (Roland, Korg), Programmed By (Synthesizer): Florian Anwander

Credits

Design: Gordan Škondrić
Mixed By: Uli Rudolf
Photography: Ljubo Trifunović
Recorded By: Cristian Leibi

Notes

Jugoton ‎– LSY-63185

Recorded at Western Studio, Munich, Germany.
Mixed at Aquarius Studio, Belgrade, Yugoslavia.

Nowadays

Šarlo Akrobata – Bistriji Ili Tuplji Čovek Biva Kad… (1981)

folder

Šarlo Akrobata (Charlot the Acrobat, a Serbo-Croatian version of Charlie Chaplin‘s name) was a seminal Yugoslav post-punk band from Belgrade. Short-lived but extremely influential, being one of the most important acts of the Yugoslav new wave movement (Novi Talas). The power-trio left an indelible mark on the entire music scene, playing skeletal, energetic ska-core with a post-punk sound reminding of Gang of Four, XTC, The Stranglers, Public Image Limited, and Frank Zappa!

If you want to know a little more about the rock development in Serbia and former Yugoslavia, pay a visit on our last entries, Katarina II and Discipline Kičme.

Let’s go to our artist:

The origin of the new wave scene in Serbia can be found in Belgrade late-70’s bands Zvuk Ulice, Limunovo Drvo, and Hipnotisano Pile. These three featured the future members of milestone groups Idoli, Šarlo Akrobata, and Električni Orgazam.

Električni Orgazam
Električni Orgazam

Guitarists Milan Mladenović and Dragomir Mihajlović performed hard rock for two years in Limunovo Drvo, before adopting the punk rock on the arrival of the bassist Dušan Kojić ‘Koja’ and drummer Ivan Vdović ‘VD’. After the departure of Mihajlović (who would play on Katarina II), they finally renamed to Šarlo Akrobata!

Over 1980-81, its first recordings were released on the compilation Paket Aranžman, today considered one of the most prominent Serbian/Yugoslav rock releases. After a second prize on Subotica Youth Fest and performance on Zagreb Bienalle, they recorded their only album, Bistriji Ili Tuplji Covek Biva Kad… (Brighter or Dumber a Man Gets When…) in April 1981, combining punkish energy with dissonant, avant-garde, and a daring approach both to the playingrecording, and performance.

Milan, Koja & Ivan = Šarlo Akrobata
Milan, Koja & Ivan = Šarlo Akrobata

The band disbanded in the winter of 1981 after a tour in Poland; Milan Mladenovic started a successful and prolific group Ekatarina Velika, and Dusan Kojic formed the progressive punk act Discipline Kičme. The alleged reason was different views on how to continue their musical expression; around 1982, the New Wave scene started to decline, as a large number of acts moved towards a more commercial sound.

During the ’80sĐorđe Balašević, for instance, dominated the mainstream pop scene, but various other rock genres also emerged, such as Jakarta, Oktobar 1864, Beograd, La Strada, Zana, and Rambo Amadeus, starting to develop and gain mainstream popularity, not only in Yugoslavia but all around Eastern Europe!

Pekinška Patkathe, the first Orthodox punk rock band, 1978!
Pekinška Patkathe, the first Orthodox punk rock band, 1978!

Let’s go to our album:

A unique punk record, full of furious guitar riffs, raw bass sound, and wild shouting! Lyrics are either nonsensical, randomly recited, either rebellious, a true example of punk angst, either minimalistic representing an auditive graffiti painting. (!)

This is a record full of studio tricks that are deconstructing a classical approach to the songwriting, gradually (or abruptly) adding/subtracting instrumental layers in the songs, repeating simple one-two-three-four chorus ad nauseam, making at mantra at first, and then deconstructing it by simply adding polyrhythmical pattern on bass, while drums get heavily processed with an echo effect and other modulations.

1981
1981

Lastly, this record is a lot different from everything that we used to hear so far, Avant punk is the perfect title to add to these crazy geniuses, forget about Ekatarina Velika (my personal favorite) and other Serbian entries, this is where it all began, observe closely and plunge forward into it, the one and only Šarlo Akrobata!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Rano Izjutra and O, O, O

Trip Da!

Tracks Include:

A1 Šarlo Je Nežan

A2 Pazite Na Decu (I)

A3 Fenomen

A4 Sad Se Jasno Vidi

A5 Rano Izjutra

A6 Ljubavna Priča

A7 Samo Ponekad

B1 Čovek

B2 Bes

B3 O, O, O …

B4 Problem

B5 Ja Želim Jako

B6 Pazite Na Decu (II)

Credits

  • Bass, Vocals: Koja
  • Drums, Vocals: Ivan Vdović
  • Guitar, Vocals: Milan Mladenović
  • Design, Photography: Goran Vejvoda
  • Photography: Danko Đurić
  • Artwork (Design): Šarlo
  • Producer, Music, Arranged, Lyrics: Šarlo Akrobata
  • Producer: Toni Jurij, Mile Miletić
  • Producer, Recorded: Đorđe Petrović

Notes

Recorded in Studio 5, Beograd, April-May 1981.

  • Recorded: Studio V PGP RTB
  • Printed: GIP Beograd

Jugoton ‎– LSY 66145

Nikola Tesla and its Magnifying Transmitter
Nikola Tesla and its Magnifying Transmitter

Disciplina Kičme – Ja Imam Šarene Oči (1985)

capa cópiaThe Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was the Yugoslav state that existed from the end of WWII (1945) until it was formally dissolved in 1992 amid the Yugoslav wars. It was a socialist state that comprised the area of the present-day independent states of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Slovenia, and Kosovo. Outside the Eastern Bloc, but a founding member of the Non-Aligned Movement and as such, it was far more opened and tolerant to western influences comparing to the (many) other socialist states.

Unlike the citizens of other Socialist countries, Yugoslavs enjoyed the freedom of travel and had easy access to Western popular culture. The Yugoslav pop and rock music scene was well developed and covered in the media including numerous magazines, radio and (pioneering) TV shows. SFR Yugoslavia was also the only Socialist country which was taking part in the Eurovision Song Contest, it joined in 1961 even before Western nations such as Portugal, Ireland, Greece and Turkey. (!)

Stjepan Filipović / 'Death to fascism, freedom to the people!'
Stjepan Filipović / ‘Death to fascism, freedom to the people!’

Let’s go to our music:

The new wave music scene emerged in the late ’70s worldwide and had a significant impact on Yugoslav culture. Like its counterparts, the British and the US movement, the Yugoslav new wave was also closely related to Punk Rock, Ska, Reggae, 2 Tone, Mod Revival, etc. The period around 1982 is considered especially crucial concerning the decline of the scene in Yugoslavia, and around the globe.

Zoran Kostić-Cane, the former vocalist of Radnička Kontrola, formed the furious garage punk group Partibrejkers and achieved huge success. Idoli, Prljavo Kazalište, and Film became pop-rock and all of them respectively achieved great mainstream success. The cult band Azra gradually moved on to a more conventional folk-rock sound and Električni Orgazam went through a psychedelic phase.

Partibrejkers, 1981
Partibrejkers, 1981

Symbols of the Yugoslav new wave era are the compilation albums Paket Aranžman, Novi Punk Val, Artistička Radna Akcija and especially movies Davitelj Protiv Davitelja (starring Idoli member Srđan Šaper) and Dečko Koji Obećava (featuring appearances by Šarlo Akrobata and Idoli). Also, an important rockumentary covering this effervescent period is Sretno Dijete, check it out! Lastly, Dušan Kojić-Koja, the former bass player of Šarlo Akrobata formed the legendary group Disciplina Kičme.

This period in the former Yugoslav music is considered a Golden Age Era!

Paket Aranžman (Compilation), 1981
Paket Aranžman (Compilation), 1981

Let’s go to our artist:

Disciplina Kičme (Spinal Discipline), currently working under the slightly altered name of Disciplin A Kitschme, was one of two spin-offs of the seminal Belgrade post-punk/new-wave band Šarlo Akrobata, the other being Ekatarina Velika.

Founded in 1982 by Dušan Kojić-Koja (bass and vocals), Disciplina Kičme was characterized by unconventional line-ups: bass + one or two drummers, sometimes with and without a brass line. Musically, they are best described as an aggressive and artistic rhythmic explosion, experimenting and seeking out new expressiveness while finding (plenty) inspiration in the traditions of punk rock, funk, jazz fusion, noise, drum n’ bass and even the works of Jimi Hendrix. (!)

Disciplina Kičme (Koja & Zica), 1982
Disciplina Kičme (Zica & Koja), 1982

Let’s go to our album:

After the first independent album release Sviđa Mi Se Da Ti Ne Bude Prijatno (1983), the band continued performing in major Yugoslav cities, mainly in small clubs, and in 1985, they released an EP Ja Imam Šarene Oči (I Have Colorful Eyes), with the single ‘Novac Neće Doći’, released by Slovenian label Dokumentarna.

Todorović did the drums and Krasavac appeared only on the intro for the track ‘Sviđa Mi Se…’ and on ’28. jun 1984′ recorded live at Belgrade’s SKC on the same date. Kojić produced the EP and for the first time included a trumpet played by Jugoslav Muškinja. Along the decades they passed through many different line-ups and styles, with a (very) active career, being internationally recognized.

Nowadays, the band enjoys a solid cult status and the last album from 2011!

Disciplin A Kitschme
Disciplin A Kitschme

Disciplina Kičme also held three albums in the YU 100: The Best albums of Yugoslav Pop and Rock music book: Sviđa Mi Se Da Ti Ne Bude Prijatno (No. 52), Zeleni Zub Na Planeti Dosade (No. 32) and Svi Za Mnom! (No. 65) (!)

The ‘IM’ highlights are Veruj Meni! and Vaspitanje.

Góða Ferð!

Tracks Include:

A1 Doboš 7 Puta (Snare Drum 7 Times)

A2 Novac Neće Doći! (Money Won’t Come)

A3 Veruj Meni! (Trust Me!)

A4 Pristanište (Pier)

B1 Sviđa Mi Se… (I Like…)

B2 Pregršt Novca (Plenty of Money)

B3 Vaspitanje (Manners)

B4 28. Jun 84!

Credits

  • Bass, Vocals, Bells: Koja (Dušan Kojić)
  • Drums, Percussion (Daire): Zica (Srđan Todorović)
  • Drums on 5 and 9: Nenad Krasavac
  • Handclaps: Đorđe Kostić, Nenad Krasavac
  • Music, Lyrics, Artwork (Cover): Dušan Kojić
  • Trumpet: Jugoslav Muškinja
  • Photography: Igor Petrović
  • Producer: Disciplina Kičme
  • Producer, Handclaps: Darko Milojković
  • Recorded: Enco Lesić
  • Recorded, Producer: Miroslav Cvetković

Recorded at studio Druga Maca, Beograd, September 1983 / 12’’ EP

B4 recorded live in SKC on 28.06.1984 w/ Branislav Trivić (sax), Zekerman (trumpet)

Dokumentarna ‎– DOK P-4

Belgrade Fortress
Belgrade Fortress

Katarina II – Katarina II (1984)

capaAfter the quintessential Belgrade new wave band of the early ’80s, Šarlo Akrobata, hit the rocks, the trio essentially splintered in two directions. Bass player Dušan Kojić went on to form Disciplina Kičme, where he continued to experiment with various musical influences, while the more lyrical, poetic of the two, vocalist/guitar player Milan Mladenović, opted to form Katarina II. Named as such, the band which later reached starry (in local terms) heights under Ekatarina Velika moniker released only this album, which quickly became a cult favorite in old Yugoslavia.

The New Wave music scene emerged at the end of the ’70s, it was especially advocated by the music magazines Polet from Zagreb and Džuboks from Belgrade, and by the TV show Rokenroler, which was famous for its artistic music videos.

Šarlo Akrobata
Šarlo Akrobata

Important bands of the Yugoslav new wave are Šarlo Akrobata, Idoli, Prljavo Kazalište, Azra, Električni Orgazam, Aerodrom, Atomsko Skoloniste, Laboratorija Zvuka, Lačni Franz, Gu Gu, Hazard, Moulin Rouge, and many others. (!)

Let’s go to our artist:

Ekatarina Velika (Catherine the Great, also called EKV) was a rock group from Belgrade, Serbia. During its existence, EKV built up a devoted following that greatly intensified and expanded after the death of its frontman Milan Mladenović in 1994, which caused the band to dissolve. The group’s core consisted of singer and guitarist Milan Mladenović, keyboardist Margita Stefanović and bassist Bojan Pečar.

Initially named Katarina II, was formed in February 1982 following the breakup of Šarlo Akrobata, Katarina II’s self-titled debut album finally came out in 1984.

Magazine Issue
Magazine Issue

After the release the group fell apart due to artistic differences, guitarist Gagi Mihajlović claimed rights to the Katarina II name, then, the remaining members settled on Ekatarina Velika. In 1985, EKV released their debut album, Ekatarina Velika, the Lp is characterized by an energetic sound and Milan’s hermetic, introspective, and metaphorical lyrics. 1986 follow up album S Vetrom Uz Lice proved to be the breakthrough album that turned them into bona fide stars!

The hits included ‘Budi Sam Na Ulici’ and ‘Ti Si Sav Moj Bol’, in addition to wider mainstream acceptance, S Vetrom Uz Lice also got some lukewarm reviews from critics complaining it sounded too much like Simple Minds and The Mission (sic).

80's Promo
80’s Promo

In 1987 the band recorded and released Ljubav, it displayed a more guitar-oriented, polished sound, partly because of new producer Theodore Yanni. It also showed the first signs of Milan’s depressive lyrics, as exemplified by song ‘Tonemo’; the band confirmed their newfound star status with two consecutive sold-out shows at Belgrade’s Hala Pionir sports arena. The 1989 album Samo Par Godina Za Nas wasn’t received well by the critics, though it does feature the song Par Godina Za Nas which was voted the best (ex) Yugoslavian rock song in 2006 by Serbian Radios!

In the ’90s the band released albums irregularly due to band changes and the political situation in Yugoslavia. Dum Dum (1991) and Neko Nas Posmatra (1993) were released but the band slowly fell apart. Milan Mladenović was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in August and died on November 5, 1994, at the age of 36.

Margita Stefanović (RIP)
Margita Stefanović

Bassist Bojan Pečar died in London on October 13, 1998, aged 37, as a result of a heart attack. Early drummers Ivan ‘Vd’ Vdović passed away in 1992 and Dušan Dejanović died from AIDS on November 16, 2000. Keyboard player and vocalist Margita Stefanović died on September 18, 2002, drug abuse was rumored (never confirmed) to be the cause, she was 43 and the last of the original line up left. (RIP all of them)

Let’s go to our album:

The band had started the recording of the album in Beograd but due to various problems, it was finally recorded for the Slovenian label ZKP RTLJ (RTV Ljubljana). The album producer was Đorđe Petrović, and guest stars were Mario Čelik (congas) and Jurij Novoselić (saxophone) from the (famous) Croatian new wave band Film.

Initially pressed in mere 3,000 copies, Katarina II is a spirited debut effort, torn somewhere between the new wave aesthetic and polished rock sound which became the hallmark of Ekatarina Velika. Essentially, there are two main vibes to discern on this album, Milan Mladenović’s songs are more progressive in its approach, like ‘Jesen’, ‘Geto’ and ‘Aut’, contrasting with the songs written by Dragan Mihajlović, ‘Vrt’, ‘Platforme’ and ‘Treba Da Se Čisti’, which retain the structure and faux-mysticism of the previous movement (Idoli and Šarlo Akrobata).

Back Cover
Back Cover

Slotted in between is a beautiful little ballad ‘Kad Krenem Ka’, written and sang by Margita, as well as a cheery pop number ‘Radostan Dan’. Overall, it all makes for a well-rounded package, with a couple of classics (Geto and Jesen) and eclipsed influences such as Talking Heads. An absolutely essential listen, Sretan Put!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Radostan Dan and Ja Znam.

Tracks Include:

A1 Aut

A2 Vrt

A3 Platforme

A4 Radostan Dan

A5 Geto

B1 Treba da Se Čisti 1

B2 Ja Znam

B3 Kad Krenem Ka

B4 Treba da Se Čisti 2

B5 Jesen

Credits

  • Bass: Bojan Pečar
  • Drums, Percussion: Ivan Vdović
  • Guitar: Dragomir Mihailović
  • Guitar, Vocals: Milan Mladenović
  • Keyboards, Vocals: Margita Stefanović
  • Congas (Featuring): Mario Čelik
  • Music, Arranged: Katarina II
  • Photography: Aleksandar Knežević, Ivan Pešić, Srđan Vejvoda
  • Design: Margita
  • Producer, Recorded: Đorđe Petrović

Recorded at studio Akvarius, Beograd, end of December, 1983.

ZKP RTVL ‎– LD 0954

Uvac Canyon
Uvac Canyon

Bebi Dol – Mustafa Single (1981)

capa cópiaSerbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia and ethnic Serbs. For centuries straddling the boundaries between East and West, Serbia had been divided among the Eastern and Western halves of the Roman Empire; then between the Kingdom of Hungary, the Frankish Kingdom and Byzantium; and then between the Ottoman Empire and the Habsburg Empire, as well the Republic of Venice in the south. (!)

These overlapping influences have resulted in cultural varieties throughout Serbia: its north leans to the profile of Central Europe, while the south is characteristic of the wider Balkans and even the Mediterranean. Serbs were initially governing the Byzantine frontiers and were later through their sworn alliance gave independence, baptized by Greek missionaries and adopted the Cyrillic script.

Migration of the Serbs, 1896 (Paja Jovanovic)
Migration of the Serbs, 1896 (Paja Jovanovic)

The Byzantine influence on Serbia was profound, firstly through the introduction of Eastern Christianity (Orthodoxy) in the Early Middle Ages. The Serbian Orthodox Church has had an enduring status with the many Serbian monasteries constituting the most valuable cultural monuments left from Serbia in the Middle Ages.

Following Serbia‘s autonomy after the Serbian revolution and eventual independence, the culture of Serbia was restrengthened within its people!

Studenica Monastery
Studenica Monastery

Let’s go to our artist:

Born as Dragana Šarić on 2nd October 1962, Belgrade. Singer and composer Šarić had contact with music since her early years, as her father, Milenko Šarić, was a jazz musician. She started in the late ’70s in the band Tarkus, in 1979 her first studio recordings: as a guest (backing) vocalist on the Igra Staklenih Perli album Vrt VetlostiYU Grupa album Samo Napred..! and also KIM Band’s 1981 release.

In 1981, with the guitarist Goran Vejvoda and the bass guitarist Ivan Vdović, she formed the short-lasting band Annoda Rouge. Soon after, Šarić under the (worldwide known) name Bebi Dol, released her (brilliant) solo debut, Oriental music-inspired single ‘Mustafa’, which she composed together with Saša Habić.

1981
1981

The song featured the recording of Slobodan Konjović‘s voice, he was at the time, Studio B musical editor, and participated the whole production. Mustafa was voted the best pop song in Yugoslavia in 1981 and was re-released, two years later, on her debut album, Ruže I Krv, to great critical acclaim and popular success!

Her next album, Ritam Srca, was released more than a decade later, in 1995, even though she regularly performed as a pop and jazz singer (for three years she lived in Cairo, singing in Sheraton hotels), recording and appearing as a guest artist on the albums of other artists. The second pause in her work came in the late ’90s and her album, Ljuta Sam, was released only in 2002 (with electronic tinges).

Early Promo
Early Promo

Her last releases, Čovek Rado Izvan Sebe Živi, in 2006 and Veče U Pozorištu in 2007, were mainly based on American covers, the last a live album. She also made a famous presentation on Eurovision 1991, with one of its mega-hits, Brazil.

Let’s go to our album:

An excellent vocalist gifted with a soaring voice, ultra-eccentric musical talent and altogether this young lady comes in some adorable, nutty package that we had not seen before or since. Here she was catapulted into the national scene, if not exactly to the stars because this single was way too underground for the mainstream audience.

Mustafa sounds one of those rare songs that simply stand the test of time and it has an original message to the protagonist: forget all those European ladies with flower pots on their heads, who make love shamelessly (!). Na Planeti Uzdaha is her own take on famous Edvard Grieg piece where the chorus of vailing and out-of-this-world voices (multi-recorded Bebi Dol herself) sing her atmospheric siren song!

Bebi Dol, Lately
Bebi Dol, Lately

Thanks to our friends from Jugo Rock Fever and many others through the net, we’re able to discover and admire this fabulous music scene developed since communist times. Here are some fine acts, from the 70’sSmak, YU Grupa, Galija and Korni Grupa (hard and prog). And incredible acts from the ’80sIdoli, Šarlo Akrobata, Električni Orgazam and Disciplina Kičme (new wave and synth-pop).

I cannot stop listening to this obscure little gem, Bebi Doll’s performance is quite something, all abroad the Trans-European rail network and Бон Воиаге!

Tracks Include:

A Mustafa

B Na Planeti Uzdaha

Credits

Arranged: A. Habić

Music, Lyrics: D. Šarić

Companies

Printed: GIP ‘Beograd’

PGP RTB ‎– 1120999

Danube, Belgrade
Danube, Belgrade