Shahram and Shohreh ‎– Telésm (1984)

Okay, let’s go back in time a little bit and recall one of the all-time favs of the ‘IM’, the stunning Ramesh. We’re proud to visit Iran again, but first off, let me remember you to always check the COMMENTS section at every entry to listen to what is referred, in the end, all that matters is the music my dearest matelots stellaires, so do not miss.

This fantastic treasury includes two of one of the mighty artists Iran has ever brought to us, to be sincere, there’s a TON of talent that flourished throughout the country before the 1979 Revolution. Gradually we will enclose most of them and for that, we will stick only with the girl today, the all-time legend Shohreh Solati. Her partner Shahram Shabpareh, simply regarded as the father of pop music in Iran, soon will also be here.

Before we start one last thing, today’s album is exclusive, so please enjoy (only) with us!

Let’s go to our artist:

Shohreh & Shahram Solati (her brother) – 70s

Shohreh Solati  (Persian: شهره صولتی) (born Fatemah Solati on January 4, 1957, in Sar-Cheshmeh) in Tehran to a well-to-do family of artists and entertainers, she developed an interest in music early on, singing at seven years of age. She later went on to study at the Tehran Conservatory of Music, where she received training in singing and the clarinet.

Her first album titled Dokhtar-e-Mashreghi (Persian for “Eastern Girl”) was successfully released in 1976 (even before she already had released a couple of singles), garnering a lot of notability, also, magazines directed toward the youth of Iran in the 1970s gave a ton of exposure to the singer. In a short period, she entered the hall of the Iranian celebs.

Cinema Stars

Shortly before the Revolution, Shohreh left Iran to perform in a series of concerts in the US and, due to restrictions imposed on entertainers by the new leadership, she wasn’t able to return. She moved to Los Angeles in 1982, settling with the exiled Iranian music industry performers of the 70s. Working with songwriters, composers, and arrangers such as Mohammed Moqadam, Jaklin, Siavash Ghomeishi, and Shubert Avakian, she produced, performed and released several new albums in an almost four-decade span.

Zan-e Rooz Magazine – Dream Team Singers

At the turn of the millennium, Shohreh continued releasing more albums outreaching her popularity beyond the borders of Iran. She has been credited to have given sold-out performances in the US, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Netherlands, Italy, Britain, Sweden, France, Switzerland, Germany, Cyprus, Turkey, Israel and beyond. (!)

She has had one of the most consistently active and prolific careers among contemporary, women Iranian singers who still remain. Having received recognition for her ability to continuously reinvent herself as well. Sometimes called the Iranian Madonna, Shohreh also has been referred to as the Queen of Scene, for her attention-grabbing music videos and stage presence, as well as the (majestic) Queen of Iranian Pop آیا کافی است؟

Actress Irene Zazians

Let’s go to our album:

This second album of her career, in addition to being divided side by side with Shahram, has the special collaboration of Manuchehr Cheshmazer in the arrangements, it also has plenty of excellent American musicians in the backing band, giving a unique touch.

Tehran’s feast winds blow here with an unusual eastern feel between folklore, disco, rock and more. Manoochehr’s keys are truly hypnotic, allow yourself to get into that!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Telésm and Gomshodeh.

Tracks Include:

A1 Telésm
A2 Boro
A3 Rosva
A4 Mitoony
B1 Ghesmat
B2 Chera Rafti
B3 Adat (New Version of Hamvatan)
B4 Gomshodeh

Musicians

Keyboards: Manoochehr Cheshmazar
Guitar: Ardeshir Farah
Bass: Jerry Wats
Drums: Alfredo Reyes, Evan Caplan
Percussion: Shahram Shabpareh, Al Chak, Manouchehr Lashkari
Tonbak: Majeed Ghorbanian
Trumpets: Howie Shear, Rick Page
Tenor Sax: Bob Shepard
Trombone: Doug Wintz, David Stout
Viola: George Hunt, Nina Roma
Violins: Rony Barg, Mihel Moro, Tom Shanon, Edward B. Bone

Arranged By: Manoochehr Cheshmazar

Credits

Recorded & Mixed: Hit City West, LA, CA
Engineered By: Jason Bell
Photo: Orad Azarbeygui
Producers: Djahanguir Tabariai, Vartan Avanessian

Notes

Taraneh ‎– 125
Taraneh Enterprises INC. 1984 U.S.A.

Actual Shohreh Solati

Katarina II – Katarina II (1984)

capaAfter the quintessential Belgrade new wave band of the early ’80s, Šarlo Akrobata, hit the rocks, the trio essentially splintered in two directions. Bass player Dušan Kojić went on to form Disciplina Kičme, where he continued to experiment with various musical influences, while the more lyrical, poetic of the two, vocalist/guitar player Milan Mladenović, opted to form Katarina II. Named as such, the band which later reached starry (in local terms) heights under Ekatarina Velika moniker released only this album, which quickly became a cult favorite in old Yugoslavia.

The New Wave music scene emerged at the end of the ’70s, it was especially advocated by the music magazines Polet from Zagreb and Džuboks from Belgrade, and by the TV show Rokenroler, which was famous for its artistic music videos.

Šarlo Akrobata
Šarlo Akrobata

Important bands of the Yugoslav new wave are Šarlo Akrobata, Idoli, Prljavo Kazalište, Azra, Električni Orgazam, Aerodrom, Atomsko Skoloniste, Laboratorija Zvuka, Lačni Franz, Gu Gu, Hazard, Moulin Rouge, and many others. (!)

Let’s go to our artist:

Ekatarina Velika (Catherine the Great, also called EKV) was a rock group from Belgrade, Serbia. During its existence, EKV built up a devoted following that greatly intensified and expanded after the death of its frontman Milan Mladenović in 1994, which caused the band to dissolve. The group’s core consisted of singer and guitarist Milan Mladenović, keyboardist Margita Stefanović and bassist Bojan Pečar.

Initially named Katarina II, was formed in February 1982 following the breakup of Šarlo Akrobata, Katarina II’s self-titled debut album finally came out in 1984.

Magazine Issue
Magazine Issue

After the release the group fell apart due to artistic differences, guitarist Gagi Mihajlović claimed rights to the Katarina II name, then, the remaining members settled on Ekatarina Velika. In 1985, EKV released their debut album, Ekatarina Velika, the Lp is characterized by an energetic sound and Milan’s hermetic, introspective, and metaphorical lyrics. 1986 follow up album S Vetrom Uz Lice proved to be the breakthrough album that turned them into bona fide stars!

The hits included ‘Budi Sam Na Ulici’ and ‘Ti Si Sav Moj Bol’, in addition to wider mainstream acceptance, S Vetrom Uz Lice also got some lukewarm reviews from critics complaining it sounded too much like Simple Minds and The Mission (sic).

80's Promo
80’s Promo

In 1987 the band recorded and released Ljubav, it displayed a more guitar-oriented, polished sound, partly because of new producer Theodore Yanni. It also showed the first signs of Milan’s depressive lyrics, as exemplified by song ‘Tonemo’; the band confirmed their newfound star status with two consecutive sold-out shows at Belgrade’s Hala Pionir sports arena. The 1989 album Samo Par Godina Za Nas wasn’t received well by the critics, though it does feature the song Par Godina Za Nas which was voted the best (ex) Yugoslavian rock song in 2006 by Serbian Radios!

In the ’90s the band released albums irregularly due to band changes and the political situation in Yugoslavia. Dum Dum (1991) and Neko Nas Posmatra (1993) were released but the band slowly fell apart. Milan Mladenović was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in August and died on November 5, 1994, at the age of 36.

Margita Stefanović (RIP)
Margita Stefanović

Bassist Bojan Pečar died in London on October 13, 1998, aged 37, as a result of a heart attack. Early drummers Ivan ‘Vd’ Vdović passed away in 1992 and Dušan Dejanović died from AIDS on November 16, 2000. Keyboard player and vocalist Margita Stefanović died on September 18, 2002, drug abuse was rumored (never confirmed) to be the cause, she was 43 and the last of the original line up left. (RIP all of them)

Let’s go to our album:

The band had started the recording of the album in Beograd but due to various problems, it was finally recorded for the Slovenian label ZKP RTLJ (RTV Ljubljana). The album producer was Đorđe Petrović, and guest stars were Mario Čelik (congas) and Jurij Novoselić (saxophone) from the (famous) Croatian new wave band Film.

Initially pressed in mere 3,000 copies, Katarina II is a spirited debut effort, torn somewhere between the new wave aesthetic and polished rock sound which became the hallmark of Ekatarina Velika. Essentially, there are two main vibes to discern on this album, Milan Mladenović’s songs are more progressive in its approach, like ‘Jesen’, ‘Geto’ and ‘Aut’, contrasting with the songs written by Dragan Mihajlović, ‘Vrt’, ‘Platforme’ and ‘Treba Da Se Čisti’, which retain the structure and faux-mysticism of the previous movement (Idoli and Šarlo Akrobata).

Back Cover
Back Cover

Slotted in between is a beautiful little ballad ‘Kad Krenem Ka’, written and sang by Margita, as well as a cheery pop number ‘Radostan Dan’. Overall, it all makes for a well-rounded package, with a couple of classics (Geto and Jesen) and eclipsed influences such as Talking Heads. An absolutely essential listen, Sretan Put!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Radostan Dan and Ja Znam.

Tracks Include:

A1 Aut

A2 Vrt

A3 Platforme

A4 Radostan Dan

A5 Geto

B1 Treba da Se Čisti 1

B2 Ja Znam

B3 Kad Krenem Ka

B4 Treba da Se Čisti 2

B5 Jesen

Credits

  • Bass: Bojan Pečar
  • Drums, Percussion: Ivan Vdović
  • Guitar: Dragomir Mihailović
  • Guitar, Vocals: Milan Mladenović
  • Keyboards, Vocals: Margita Stefanović
  • Congas (Featuring): Mario Čelik
  • Music, Arranged: Katarina II
  • Photography: Aleksandar Knežević, Ivan Pešić, Srđan Vejvoda
  • Design: Margita
  • Producer, Recorded: Đorđe Petrović

Recorded at studio Akvarius, Beograd, end of December, 1983.

ZKP RTVL ‎– LD 0954

Uvac Canyon
Uvac Canyon