Shahram and Shohreh ‎– Telésm (1984)

Okay, let’s go back in time a little bit and recall one of the all-time favs of the ‘IM’, the stunning Ramesh. We’re proud to visit Iran again, but first off, let me remember you to always check the COMMENTS section at every entry to listen to what is referred, in the end, all that matters is the music my dearest matelots stellaires, so do not miss.

This fantastic treasury includes two of one of the mighty artists Iran has ever brought to us, to be sincere, there’s a TON of talent that flourished throughout the country before the 1979 Revolution. Gradually we will enclose most of them and for that, we will stick only with the girl today, the all-time legend Shohreh Solati. Her partner Shahram Shabpareh, simply regarded as the father of pop music in Iran, soon will also be here.

Before we start one last thing, today’s album is exclusive, so please enjoy (only) with us!

Let’s go to our artist:

Shohreh & Shahram Solati (her brother) – 70s

Shohreh Solati  (Persian: شهره صولتی) (born Fatemah Solati on January 4, 1957, in Sar-Cheshmeh) in Tehran to a well-to-do family of artists and entertainers, she developed an interest in music early on, singing at seven years of age. She later went on to study at the Tehran Conservatory of Music, where she received training in singing and the clarinet.

Her first album titled Dokhtar-e-Mashreghi (Persian for “Eastern Girl”) was successfully released in 1976 (even before she already had released a couple of singles), garnering a lot of notability, also, magazines directed toward the youth of Iran in the 1970s gave a ton of exposure to the singer. In a short period, she entered the hall of the Iranian celebs.

Cinema Stars

Shortly before the Revolution, Shohreh left Iran to perform in a series of concerts in the US and, due to restrictions imposed on entertainers by the new leadership, she wasn’t able to return. She moved to Los Angeles in 1982, settling with the exiled Iranian music industry performers of the 70s. Working with songwriters, composers, and arrangers such as Mohammed Moqadam, Jaklin, Siavash Ghomeishi, and Shubert Avakian, she produced, performed and released several new albums in an almost four-decade span.

Zan-e Rooz Magazine – Dream Team Singers

At the turn of the millennium, Shohreh continued releasing more albums outreaching her popularity beyond the borders of Iran. She has been credited to have given sold-out performances in the US, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Netherlands, Italy, Britain, Sweden, France, Switzerland, Germany, Cyprus, Turkey, Israel and beyond. (!)

She has had one of the most consistently active and prolific careers among contemporary, women Iranian singers who still remain. Having received recognition for her ability to continuously reinvent herself as well. Sometimes called the Iranian Madonna, Shohreh also has been referred to as the Queen of Scene, for her attention-grabbing music videos and stage presence, as well as the (majestic) Queen of Iranian Pop آیا کافی است؟

Actress Irene Zazians

Let’s go to our album:

This second album of her career, in addition to being divided side by side with Shahram, has the special collaboration of Manuchehr Cheshmazer in the arrangements, it also has plenty of excellent American musicians in the backing band, giving a unique touch.

Tehran’s feast winds blow here with an unusual eastern feel between folklore, disco, rock and more. Manoochehr’s keys are truly hypnotic, allow yourself to get into that!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Telésm and Gomshodeh.

Tracks Include:

A1 Telésm
A2 Boro
A3 Rosva
A4 Mitoony
B1 Ghesmat
B2 Chera Rafti
B3 Adat (New Version of Hamvatan)
B4 Gomshodeh

Musicians

Keyboards: Manoochehr Cheshmazar
Guitar: Ardeshir Farah
Bass: Jerry Wats
Drums: Alfredo Reyes, Evan Caplan
Percussion: Shahram Shabpareh, Al Chak, Manouchehr Lashkari
Tonbak: Majeed Ghorbanian
Trumpets: Howie Shear, Rick Page
Tenor Sax: Bob Shepard
Trombone: Doug Wintz, David Stout
Viola: George Hunt, Nina Roma
Violins: Rony Barg, Mihel Moro, Tom Shanon, Edward B. Bone

Arranged By: Manoochehr Cheshmazar

Credits

Recorded & Mixed: Hit City West, LA, CA
Engineered By: Jason Bell
Photo: Orad Azarbeygui
Producers: Djahanguir Tabariai, Vartan Avanessian

Notes

Taraneh ‎– 125
Taraneh Enterprises INC. 1984 U.S.A.

Actual Shohreh Solati

Elektra – Keegi (1981)

One of the greatest things about running the ‘IM’ is having the curiosity to hear sounds from all over the world and that is why today’s post is the inaugural of a country that had not yet entered our route: Estonia. The work that the Frotee label has been doing for the last few years is priceless, thanks to them we can present you this unfamiliar artist, and for the most avid travelers we can forefront a couple of suitable names that came from this fantastic musical scene, groups like Väntorel, Keeris, Tornaado, Velly Joonas, Gunnar Graps and Magnetic Band, Fix, Ruja and many more deserve your close attention.

Along with our journey, other eesti-rock gems will be here, so please come always sõber!

Let’s go to our artist:

Elektra started out in the middle of the 1960s as a female vocal group with a fluctuating line-up which was accompanied by different instrumental groups.

Ansambel Elektra 60s

At the end of the 1970s, pianist Aarne Saluveer became the head of the backing musicians and his friends Agu Tammeorg, Meelis Punder, and Jaan Karp joined the band. During this period, Elektra performed together with the college girl band Kooli-Prii which Kadri Hunt, who was the daughter of Elektra’s conductor Märt Hunt, had formed together with her classmates. By 1981, the Kooli-Prii girls had replaced the former singers of Elektra.

Kadri Hunt loved songs with Afro-American influences, which she heard from radio or the few records she could get her hands on. Kooli-Prii played these songs at their concerts and (legendary) soul singer Marju Kuut taught them voice placing. The girls went to a school which focused on English teaching so they sang in English at their concerts but they had to get the lyrics translated in order to avoid problems with recordings (censorship).

Hiiglane Marju Kuut

In 1981, Elektra recorded only a few disco songs but that was it because the number of music studios in Tallinn was very limited. For example, the Estonian Radio studio where they could record with 8-track tape recorders was vacant only during the nights. (!)

During the next few years, disco music went out of fashion in Estonia and the repertoire of the band became more popular to match the musical taste of Aarne Saluveer (the band’s leader). In addition to that, Kadri Hunt became its only singer. In 1985, Elektra released its only record (a 7” EP) and their music had become way distanced from soul music. By 1986 the group had dissolved with some of its members going solo or engaging new bands.

Let’s go to our album:

Elektra 1981

Keegi with the original title “You Might Need Somebody” was based on Randy Crawford’s interpretation of the song which was released the same year, the original was a yacht-rock song performed by Turley Richards. The original version of Meid Kaasa Muusika Viib called “Jump To The Beat” was made famous by the teenage singer Stacy Lattishaw.

These two cuts from this single are amazing, I wasn’t aware of the originals the first time I’ve listened to, so I still think these covers are a MUST, there’s something with these gals vocals and Estonian phonetics that kept me mesmerized! Kas Sa Tahaksid Tulla?

Tracks Include:

A Keegi
Lyrics By: Märt Hunt
Written By: Nan O’Byrne, Tom Snow

B Meid Kaasa Muusika Viib
Lyrics By: Märt Hunt
Written By: Lisa Walden, Narada Michael Walden

Credits

Bass: Meelis Punder
Drums: Jaan Karp
Flute: Tauno Saviauk
Guitar: Agu Tammeorg
Keyboards: Aarne Saluveer
Vocals: Kadri Hunt, Kersti Raik, Signe Tükk, Tiina Kalle

Mastered By: Lynn Petrin
Photography: Arno Saar
Recorded By: Mati Brauer

Notes

Frotee ‎– FRO004

Mastered At: Ebony Cuts

Recorded at Eesti Raadio Studio, Tallinn, October 1981.

Tallinn Landscape

San Ul Lim (산울림) – Hourglass at Noon (한낮의 모래시계) [1979]

capa cópiaSan Ul Lim aka Sanulrim, is a South Korean power trio combo, the name is the combination of words, San (, mountain) and Ullim (울림, echo). The band is considered one of the most influential figures in the Korean Rock scene, its musical experiments varied from songs for children to progressive and psychedelic rock.

They broke up after the death of the drummer, Kim Chang-ik (김창익), in 2008 (RIP). Upon its release in 1977, their first LP sold over a half-million copies and paved the way for many further volumes. The songs are full of fuzz guitar, tinny keyboards, unique timbres, and simple production, reminding one of the American garage and pop-psychedelic groups from the ’60s, but with a very special Asian flavor. (!)

Let’s go to our artist:

The three members of San Ul Lim are brothers, they were Kim Chang-wan (김창완, 1954-), Kim Chang-hoon (김창훈, 1956-), and Kim Chang-ik (김창익, 1958-2008).

San Ul Lim, 70's
San Ul Lim, 70’s

The band, formed when the three were university students, was initially called Mui and was never meant to be professional. Kim Chang-hoon’s other college band, named Sand Pebbles, won the MBC College K-pop Festival with their song, What Shall I Do?; Mui was initially nominated to win with their song, Please Open the Door but wasn’t qualified because Chang-wan had already graduated from the university.

Gaining confidence, the band looked for a music agency, changing the name into San Ul Lim by their new manager’s demand. At first, they recorded a demo tape, the brothers had already over one hundred songs written before its debut, to then finally arrive at SRB label. Willing to sound like AC/DC heavy guitars, they’ve stumbled into insufficient technological know-how, thus, only depending on psychedelic ad-lib or fuzz guitar, this ironically made their sound unique, founding a longlasting stamp!

Live
Live

Their first album entitled Vol.1 아니벌써 (What, Already?) came out in December 1977, the Lp largely impacted the Korean music scene, becoming both critically and commercially successful, revealing a new type of music which Koreans had never heard before, people were totally absorbed with the psychedelic/hard rock sound.

San Ul Lim’s stellar appearance was significant because they vitalized the Korean popular music scene, which was currently devastated after several musicians were charged and arrested for marijuana possession. The dictatorial government of Park Chung-hee leaded mass boycotts on pop/rock music around 1975. (!)

During 1977-1984, they released more than 10 albums, ending in the middle of the disco boom (a bit late in South Korea) in 1984. With the K-pop retrospective revival during the ’90s, all of their Lp’s were reissued and a tribute album was released.

K-Rock Portrait
K-Rock Portrait

They performed in Seoul on July 5th, 2007 for their 30th anniversary and planned to release a vol. 14 album within the same year, unfortunately, on January 29, 2008, drummer Kim Chang-ik was killed in a work-related accident in Vancouver, Canada. Ever since, Kim Chang-wan announced the end of the band, though he recently reformed it and occasionally plays with another formation. He also has been actively performing as a musician, painter, actor, writer, and broadcast celebrity!

Let’s go to our album:

Today we’ve got a very special album, of an extremely important band! Still unknown to large Western audiences, (still expecting an official re-release of their albums), but thanks to the blogosphere work from Gold Korea Vinyl (for instance), Vol. 1 and 2 can be easily heard on youtube, soundcloud, etc. Here, let’s go a little further.

Last Revival
Last Revival

Together with Vol. 3, this Vol. 5 are my favorite, even if the compositions seem a bit naive in terms of harmony and arrangements, this power trio REALLY understands about colors and effects, maximizing the (holy) punk aesthetic of less is more.

There’s a previously unseen disco offshoot here, San Ul Lim’s vision and concept of it are quite unique, embracing multiple passages and genres. Lastly, Arirang’s cool series of documentaries, are available with legends in English, scrutinizing every detail of the rock development in the country, with an exclusive chapter on the band, its history, and idol status. Needless to say, more, check it out and ການເດີນທາງທີ່ດີ!

The ‘IM’ highlights are 무녀도 (No Women Island) and 백자 (White Porcelain).

Tracks Include:

A1 한낮의 모래시계 (An Hourglass in the Afternoon)

A2 오솔길 (A Trail)

A3 (The Spring)

A4 포도밭으로 가요 (Let’s Go to a Vineyard)

A5 무녀도 (No Women Island)

B1 이렇게 갑자기 (All of a Sudden)

B2 띄워라 (Fly a Kite)

B3 왜가 (Why, Leave)

B4 백자 (White Porcelain)

Credits

Chang Wan Kim (김창완): guitar, keyboards, vocals

Chang Hoon Kim (김창훈): bass

Chang Ik Kim (김창익): drums

Released on September 1979

SRB SR-0171

Bibimbap (Korean Cuisine)
Bibimbap (Korean Cuisine)

Chrisye – Sabda Alam (1978)

prambanan cópiaGamelan is traditional ensemble music of Java and Bali in Indonesia, made up predominantly of percussive instruments. The most common instruments are metallophones played by mallets as well as a set of hand-played drums called kendhang which registers the beat. It also includes xylophones, bamboo flutes, bowed instrument called rebab, and even female vocalists called sindhen.

The popularity of gamelan has declined since modern pop music, though gamelan is still commonly played at formal occasions and in many traditional ceremonies. For most Indonesians, gamelan is an integral part and a symbol of Indonesian culture.

Gamelan Ensemble
Gamelan Ensemble

They are distinguished by their collection of instruments and use of voice, tunings, repertoire, style, and cultural context. In general, no two gamelan ensembles are the same, and those that arose in prestigious courts are often considered to have their own style. Certain styles may also be shared by nearby ensembles, leading to a regional style. The varieties are grouped geographically, with the principal division between the styles favoured by the Balinese, Javanese, and Sundanese peoples.

Typically, players in the gamelan will be familiar with dance movespoetry, while dancers are able to play (along) in the ensemble. In wayang, the dalang (puppeteer) must have a thorough knowledge of gamelan, as he gives the cues for the music.

Certain gamelans are associated with specific rituals, such as the Gamelan Sekaten, which is used in the celebration of Mawlid an-Nabi (Muhammad‘s birthday), other pieces are also believed to possess magic powers, and can be used to ward off evil spirits!

Children's Gamelan Orchestra at Peliatan, Bali
Children’s Gamelan Orchestra at Peliatan, Bali

The gamelan has been appreciated by several western composers (Colin McPhee, Béla Bartók, Francis Poulenc, Olivier Messiaen, Pierre Boulez, Benjamin Britten, Steve Reich, Phillip Glass, György Ligeti and John Cage), most famously Claude Debussy who heard a Javanese gamelan in the premiere of Louis-Albert Bourgault-Ducoudray‘s Rapsodie Cambodgienne at the Paris Exposition World’s Fair of 1889.

The gamelan that Debussy heard in it was in the slendro scale and its equal-tempered whole tone scale appears in his music. A Javanese gamelan-like heterophonic texture is emulated on occasion, particularly in Pagodes, from Estampes (solo piano, 1903), in which the great gong‘s cyclic punctuation is symbolized by a prominent perfect fifth.

XIX Century Gamelan
XIX Century Gamelan

There is a famous Javanese saying that sums up Gamelan’s role importance in Indonesian habitual daily life: It is not official until the gong is hung’. (!)

Let’s go to our artist:

Chrismansyah Rahadi (16 September 1949 – 30 March 2007) was born in Jakarta, as the second of three brothers from Laurens Rahadi and Hana. He graduated from high school in 1967 and had the opportunity of studying Architectural Engineering in APP Trisakti, but he dropped out on its third year. Chrisye initiated his career in music by joining the Sabda Nada Band in 1968, the short-lived group morphed into Gipsy (later famous Guruh Gipsy) in 1969 along with some change of personnel.

70's
70’s

Gipsy became a well-respected band from Jakarta and had the most luxurious equipment of the day. In 1971/1972 they flew to New York and played in the Ramayana Restaurant for about a year. Back to Indonesia, Chrisye managed to popularize the song Lilin-Lilin Kecil (Small Candles) winning the Youth Contest Prambors Songwriting Contest in 1977. His first albums Badai Pasti Berlalu and Sabda Alam managed to be very popular and successful in the domestic market.

This would only be the beginning of a highly consolidated career through the ’80s and ’90s, he’s merely one of the biggest record sellers from all-time in Indonesia!

Let’s go to our album:

In May 1978 Chrisye began work on his first (solo) album Sabda Alam (Nature’s Order), incorporating several songs by other artists and some written by himself, including the title song, which he recorded it after locking himself in the studio. The album, greatly influenced by Badai Pasti Berlalu (OST Lp) and drawing on the double-tracking technique (the vocals are recorded twice to achieve fuller sound), was released in August that year. Heavily promoted in a campaign during which Chrisye was interviewed on the national television station TVRI and on the radio.

Chrisye
Chrisye (RIP)

The album eventually sold more than 400,000 copies! (phew)

This renowned artist (still) remains unknown to most of the Western public, today we exclusively present one of his greatest releases, full of melodic and harmonic beauty, Chrisye’s soulful interpretation is quite something. Supported by a sharp band with the always welcome participation of Yockie on keyboards, once more splitting the arrangements with Chrisye, the Lp got prog ballads, folk, disco, a fantastic version of Smaradhana (Guruh Gipsy’s song), female chorus, and one of the greatest Indonesian songs in my opinion, Anak Jalanan, this album is no joke!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Cita Secinta and Anak Jalanan.

Vjaġġ Tajba!

Tracks Include:

A1 Juwita

A2 Sabda Alam

A3 Smaradhana

A4 Duka Sang Bahaduri

A5 Cita Secinta

B1 Kala Sang Surya Tenggelam

B2 Nada Asmara

B3 Citra Hitam

B4 Adakah

B5 Anak Jalanan

Credits

Yockie: Acoustic Piano, Keyboards

Chrisye: Bass, Guitar

Keenan: Drums, Percussion

Ronnie: Piano, String Melody, Synths

Nina, Ana, Ani: Backing Vocals

Arranged: Yockie and Chrisye

Musica / msc7060 (cassette)

Balinese Cuisine
Balinese Cuisine

Ramasandiran Somusundaram – Skinny Woman (1974)

ramasandrian

Hello everyone! Today’s entry will be very short due to the lack of information available from this curious artist. An Indian (raised?) in Italy, who played with important members of the progressive scene from there. We thank our colleagues from Boxes of Toys for the rip and remember that this is an obscure album, the supposed lack of sound quality should be tolerated. Many of you may already know the funky Skinny Woman, but this album has much more to offer, let’s check!

Let’s go to our artist:

In 1974 a new incarnation of Garybaldi was formed by Bambi Fossati along with old cohort Maurizio Cassinelli, bassist Roberto Ricci, and Indian percussionist Ramasandiran Somusundaram as Bambibanda & Melodie. The percussionist previously active as a session musician also released an album and no less than three singles (in a more commercial vein) between 1974 and 1976 on the Magma label.

Single Cover, 1973
Single Cover, 1973

Let’s go to our album:

The A-side have a funky (non-stop) party atmosphere, with heavy percussion, cosmic keyboards, insane flutes, lo-fi brass, all wrapped in an exploitation feel. On B side things slow down a little bit, we see some influences of Ramasandrian homeland, with oriental tingesmelodic ballads, in a very peaceful Hindu atmosphere. (!)

It’s strange to imagine that this is the same artist from the beginning, the songwriting, a bit iffy on side A, convinces us in B-side, along with the tight band that accompanies him. The overall feeling at the end of the album is of surprise and contentment!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Electronic Heart and Chan.

यात्रा मंगलमय हो!

Tracks Include:

A1 Skinny Woman

A2 I Am Afraid of Losing You

A3 Everybody

A4 Electronic Heart

A5 Leon Dance

B1 Swamy

B2 Bombay

B3 Hari Siva

B4 Shanghai

B5 Chan

Credits

  • Percussions, Congas, Vocals: Ramasandiran Somusundaram
  • Drums, Timbales: Gianni Belleno
  • Composer: Niliomi (Vittorio de Scalzi), Datum (Giorgio Usai), Gianni Belleno

Produzione Studio G – Genova

Magma ‎– MAGL 18006

Bambibanda E Melodie
Bambibanda E Melodie