Abílio Manoel – Compacto Duplo (1974)

capa cópia

Abilio Manuel Robalo Pedro (Lisboa, February 3, 1947 – Itacaré, June 30, 2010) was a singer, composer, and music producer. Portuguese settled in Brazil since he was seven years old, Abílio also worked as a radio broadcaster, advertising person, film director, audio operator and composer of jingles and soundtracks.

Let’s go to their history:

Brazil. He started his career in 1966, preparing himself to join the Physics course. The first performance took place at the program Show do Meio Dia, presented by Pagano Sobrinho on TV Excelsior. In 1967 he entered to University of São Paulo and, while studying physics, he used to perform in concerts promoted at the university campus.

That year, came an invitation to represent the USP on the first Festival Latino-América de la Canción Universitaria placed in Santiago, Chile. He won the award for best composer, thanks to the song Minha Rua. This presentation brought him the first contract with Odeon, who would record the following year, their first Lp, with musical direction by Milton Miranda and arrangements by Edmundo Peruzzi.

Newspaper Article
Newspaper Article

In 1968, he competed at the TV Excelsior festival with the song Quem Dera and in the Festival Internacional da Canção with Catavento. After the I Festival Universitário from TV Tupi, he participated with Samba de Roda and Tudo Bem, included on its first single. In 1969, won the II Festival Universitário, still on Tupi, with Pena Verde, perhaps his greatest success, whose single, reached the top of the charts in 1970, making it known throughout the country and Latin America!

He released its second Lp (Pena Verde), in 1970, making television appearances and concerts in Mexico, where he still recorded a compact. During the ’70s launches four more Lp’s and several singles. In 1977 began working at Radio Bandeirantes from São Paulo. In 1980 he composed the soundtrack to Pixote, directed by Hector Babenco. Its last album, Curso das Águas, came out in 1983, by RCA Victor.

70's Pomo
70’s Pomo

The year 1984 started with Abílio presenting the program América do Sol, on Radio USP in São Paulo. As a producer, he was responsible for launching the homonymous collection, by Band and Copacabana labels. From 1997 he devoted to making advertising jingles, soundtracks and promoting many artistic events. After decades of hiatus, he was preparing to return his artistic career, when he had a heart attack during the 2010 World Cup. He was holidaying in Bahia at the time. (RIP)

Let’s go to our album:

Even not being his most ardent fan, today’s record shows us, with only four songs, all the quality behind this unfamiliar author. Slightly recognized even in Brazil, Abílio’s music has a perfect blend between samba, rock, and folk.

Once more, Brazilian arrangers are over the regular, with exquisite horns, reeds and a whole context of scholar and pop music. With shiny moods that go from the yearning to funny, like Luiza Manequim, a spectacular horn-samba! And Tudo Azul N’América do Sul a satirical view about the early 70’s Rio: on one side the military terror (persecution, torture, and death), on another, the sea, clear skies, and blazing sun.

Portrait
Portrait

The alienation lyrics that music (falsely) proposes, talk directly with Pilantragem, a musical movement from the same epoch, led by Carlos Imperial and Wilson Simonalwho preached always to look to the ‘good’ side of the life, though, with selfish, consumerist and sexist values (sic). Ona Bidaia!

Tracks Include:

A1 Pena Verde (Feat. Rosa Rebelo) /// 1969

A2 Luiza Manequim /// 1971

B1 Andréa /// 1970

B2 Tudo Azul N’America do Sul /// 1971

Music and lyrics: Abílio Manoel (except B2 ~ Abílio Manoel – Carvalho)

Double Compact, Odeon S7-BD 1297

No credit to the musicians and arrangers.

Douro River, Portugal
Douro River, Portugal

Mikael Ramels Musikband – Rycker Dej I Svansen (1979)

capa

Sweden. Despite being known worldwide by its pop mass bands such as ABBA, Roxette, and Ace of Base, this Scandinavian rich country saw the usual rock development throughout its 60’s and 70’s in a very special way.

The so-called Progg scene, a left-wing and anti-commercial heterogeneous movement that paved the path for bands who didn’t want to sign with major labels, intended their own distribution methods and organized numerous music festivals and forums along the country’s decade. This unique attitude, unthinkable in many countries that would still suffer from military coups or persecution, featured a broad spectrum of musical styles, such as pop, folk, psych and prog

Artists like Bo Hansson, Mikael Ramel, Kebnekajse, Hoola Bandoola Band, Nationalteatern and Samla Mammas Manna vied for the attention of anarchists, communists, and socialists audiences in the very early of the ’70s. (!)

Steampacket
Steampacket

The movement was closely connected to similar fronts in arts, theatre, design, and to alternative lifestyles; most lyrics were in Swedish and had a strong criticism against the governing Social Democratic Party. There was also a movement in support of the National Front for the Liberation of Vietnam, for instance.

And the famous protests to stop tennis matches against tennis players from the Pinochet-ruled Chile in Båstad 1975. At the end of the decade, however, the movement started to decline, as many of the bands disintegrated and the music forums were closed. The left-wing ideals became less dominating among youngsters, and rock/folk were being replaced by hard rock and electronic music.

Steampacket, At Ease
Steampacket, At Ease

On the other hand, since the end of the ’90s and the saturation from the vanguards of yore, many Progg bands have experienced some renaissance, reuniting for concerts, and new records/DVDs. The film Together (2000), directed by Lukas Moodysson goes through that era, with a satirical view of socialist values, tied with a bittersweet comedy, it also offers some brilliant soundtrack, check it!

Let’s go to their history:

Mikael Ramel is the son of the legendary Povel Ramel, whose witty tunes from the ’40s and onwards have made him one of the Swedish national treasures, probably the greatest one! With influences from Beatles, Zappa & The Mothers of Invention, The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, and Dr. John, they recorded a single together in 1965 before Mikael formed Steampacket the same year.

Recording, 70's
Recording, 70’s

He played all the instruments himself on his first solo Ep, released on January 1967, special note to the track ‘Bara Ett Par Dar’. Ramel started working on his first solo album in 1969, painstakingly putting it together in his home studio, he wasn’t done until three years later. At the time of the release of Till Dej, Ramel was an also a member of Flasket Brinner, Sweden’s prolific progg / jazz band!

Till Dej (1972) is a great effort of inventive and gracious Swedish-language folk-psychedeliaExtravagansa (1974) features more experimentation and was made by the same core musicians. 3:Dje Skivan (1977) is more polished but the experimenting is kept at bay. The album features the rhythm section of Kaj Söderström (bass, keyboards) and Hempo Hillden (drums). Both were members of Splash, the band plays on half of the tracks on Ramel’s last 70’s album, Rycker Dej i Svansen.

Mikael Ramel continues making music, although he’s a music therapist.

Portrait
Portrait

Let’s go to our record:

A bit aside from the whole scène, Mikael stands out as one of the most famous and talented artists from Sweden, imagine yourself being a son from the greatest artist of its country, it shouldn’t be easy, but Mikael was not complexed with that, aside from early comparisons, he traced its own path and sound. His first two records got a straight folk-rock direction that was completely dissolved in this one, again this is a marvelous point outside the curve of someone’s career!

Mikael: ‘This Lp was made with two different bands. I came in contact with the group Splash from Söderhamn. I had heard them and liked very much for their experimental and crazy folkloric music. After a period of contact, we agreed on an exchange, I promised to record an Lp with them on my existing mobile studio, for letting me use them as musicians in the whole production. They were nine people in the band, it was one of life’s absolute peaks! Earnings eventually became the Splash (1978) Lp.’

Today
Today

With a beautiful voice, tight band, arrangements and a fabulous mix of genres, the ‘IM’ highlights are Förpackningar, a megaton reggae that could be perfectly played by The Wailers!. And Jag Rycker Dig I Svansen, a crazy disco-funk with some prog tinges that flourishes into guitar solos and Latin percussion. Aside from these two, the album offers moments that will surely surprise you, this is also an exclusive rip!

Ha En Trevlig Resa!

Tracks Include:

A1 Mr. Stand-In

A2 Utflykt – A) Samling B) Karusellsväng C) På Väg

A3 Förpackningar

A4 Toner

B1 Jag Rycker Dej I Svansen

B2 Hon Och Han

B3 Jönsson Med Lien

B4 En Ton För Ett Don

B5 Mr. Byråkrat

B6 Djupt Till Roten

All songs and lyrics: Mikael Ramel

Mikael Ramel Band

1~5 recorded in May 1975 by Mikael Ramel Musikband and guest musicians.

Mikael Ramel & Splash

5~10 recorded in Villa Splash, Söderhamn, April 1978 with Splash.

Credits

Tomas Jutterström: keyboards / Kenny Håkansson: guitar

Bruno Råberg: bass / Bosse Skoglund: drums

Guest Musicians

Bengt Dalén: guitar / Tony Ellis: organ, guitar / Bill Ohrstrom: congas

Splash

Leif Halldén: trumpet, flugelhorn / Lennart Löfgren: bass trombone

Torbjörn Carlsson: tenor sax, flute, oboe

Christer Holm: baritone saxophone, clarinet, bassoon

Christer Jansson: guitar / Kay Söderström: bass / Hempo Hillden: drums

Sonet SLP – 2650

Stockholm Sight
Stockholm Sight

Kostas Tournas (Κώστας Τουρνάς) – Aperanta Horafia (Απέραντα Χωράφια) [1972]

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Kostas Tournas (Κώστας Τουρνάς) born on September 23, 1949, Tripoli, Greece. Aside Mariza Koch and Dionysis Savvopoulos, he’s certainly one of the greatest solo artists from its country, with dozens of albums, international recognition, passing through rock, pop, glam, disco, and many other influences; we’ll stick to its foremost concept gem by now. Still active, he’s also a member of the center-right political party New Democracy (sic). A dedicated post for Poll and his other solo classic Astroneira will appear throughout our galaxy, don’t miss it!

Let’s go to his history:

As a child Kostas enjoyed singing popular Greek melodies of the era, due to financial difficulties, his family eventually moved to Kypseli, Athens, in 1959. He managed to finish high school and in its spare time, he used to study the guitar which he received as a present from his mother. At age 13 he joined his first band. Largely self-educated he took up guitar lessons in 1965, pursuing a more serious musical career, shortly after, he was with a garage band called The Teenagers.

Poll Days
Poll Days

In Athens, Kostas worked at various music clubs, playing melodramatic Italian and French songs which he didn’t enjoy very much. He was a Beatles fan to the point of having watched A Hard Day’s Night seven times in a single day. (!)

He started to write original Greek material at the end of the ’60s in collaboration with his childhood friend Robert Williams. After returning from the army (69/70), Kostas founded Poll, one of the first rock groups of Greece, along with Robert Williams and Stavros Logarides. They started appearing at the popular Athens music club Kyttaro presenting folk-rock songs influenced by the hippie culture.

A second album featured the anti-war song Anthrope Agapa, allegedly the first protest rock-song in Greece. They only existed for two years and managed to release two albums (1971 and 1972). Their easy-listening ballad style made them very popular with Greek audiences. After Poll disbanded, Kostas pursued a solo career.

80's Portrait
80’s Portrait

Let’s go to our album:

In 1972 he released the album Απέραντα Χωράφια (Infinite Fields) based on songs he wrote with Poll but then blown up into a 35-minute (!) psychedelic pop-rock symphonic work which he presented with the group Ruth. This Magnus opus, much influenced by Beethoven, had no distinction into separate tracks, Kostas wrote and arranged it for a symphonic orchestra and provided vocals, guitars, and keyboards himself, as an autobiographical concept album. (!)

With a beautiful resemblance to David Axelrod’s work, Kostas managed to create multiple layers and passages along with the record. Brilliantly played and recorded, it helps us to enter into the greek rock scene, although it hasn’t much folklore or traditional instruments on it, this western rock-opera deserves your full attention!

Latterly
Latterly

Our usual highlights become one single track that flows into a rock combo with some fuzz, folk-ballads, sound effects, grand orchestra, and superb outcome. Goeie Reis!

Tracks Include:

A1 Απέραντα Χωράφια

B1 Απέραντα Χωράφια

Companies

  • Recorded At: Polysound Studio
  • Record Company: PolyGram
  • Phonographic Copyright (p): PolyGram Records S.A. (Greece)
  • Manufactured: Digital Press Hellas

Credits

  • Artwork Cover, Design Cover: Στέργιος Δελιαλής
  • Conductor (Διεύθυνση Ορχήστρας): Κώστας Κλάββας
  • Engineer, Effects (Ηλεκτρονικά Εφέ): Γιάννης Σμυρναίος
  • Orchestra: Ορχήστρα Της Λυρικής Σκηνής
  • Producer: Κώστας Φασόλας
  • Voice, Lyrics, Music: Κώστας Τουρνάς

Notes

Παίζει η ορχήστρα της λυρικής σκηνής και οι ‘Ρούθ’.

Polydor ‎– 2421027

Karpathos Costume
Karpathos Costume

Mariza Koch (Μαρίζα Κωχ) – Arabas (Αραμπάς) [1971]

capa cópia

Greece. The cradle of modern civilization, an amalgamation of elements of Minoic, Phoenician, Doric, and Ionic cultures that at one time spread from the Caucasus to the Pyrenees via Asia Minor, and from the Crimean to Sicily and the North-African coast. Plato, Xenophon, Homer, Socrates, Pythagoras, Archimedes still live on, in their works, thoughts, and writings. Despite its glorious past, Romans, Byzantines, Visigoths, Slavs, Bulgarians, Venetians, Crusaders, Serbs, and finally, Turks took it in their turn to occupy Greece for about 1,800 years!

The last Turkish garrison left Athens in March 1833, they managed to stay more or less independent for just over 100 years, when Hitler and Mussolini decided they’d go for a life-long supply of Ouzo (a greek drink) in April 1941. After a good 20 years of turbulent democracy, Greece was back in the hands of the extreme right when the colonels took over on April 21st, 1967, they were to remain in power ’till 1974.

A democratic and republican constitution was promulgated only in June 1975.

Military Junta Logo
Military Junta Logo

The presence of the military junta during the late ’60s and early ’70s has been quite a deterrent, having prevented a musical development concurrent with that of other European countries. To complete the picture, the continued loss of civil rights, widespread censorship, political detentions, and torture, caused countless confrontations and assassination attempts on both sides. In 1969, Costa-Gavras masterpiece Z, was the first attempt to internationalize the message of serious lack of civil rights and its situation. The film was banned from Greece, at the time.

The late ’60s were characterized by political oppression from the authorities and a strong folk movement (oriented by the political left) that sought its identification in the traditional Hellenic roots. A lot of male and female folk singers were known throughout Greece but the outside world remained virtually oblivious to them. Most of the bands that existed back then, however, played only cover versions of English-sung hits and their overall approach was orientated towards light pop and beat. They were called The Rabbits, The Stormies, The Teenagers, The Knacks, etc.

Z's Poster
Z’s Poster

In the very beginning, the most well-known bands were from outside Greece: Aphrodite’s Child and Axis, achieved relative commercial success in France, singing in English, debuting albums, single charts and appearances on TV shows.

Domestically, over the ’70s, bands and artists like, Socrates Drank the Conium, Nostradamus, Akritas, Iraklis, Dionysis Savvopoulos, Manos Hadjidakis, Kostas Tournas, and Pavlos Sidiropoulos, were largely observed, censored or even arrested by the military junta. (!) This is some of the key figures in the national rock scene, ελληνικό ροκ (Greek Rock). Even the term psychedelic is derived from the Ancient Greek, words psuchē (ψυχή – psyche, mind) and dēlōsē (δήλωση – manifest): 

Translating to mind-manifesting!

But today we’ll speak of a woman, their achievements and wonderful music.

Let’s go to her history:

Mariza Koch is one of the most renowned Greek singers of all time (together with Fleury Dandonakis). Endowed with a superb voice and a colorful timbre, she’s famous for served the Greek traditional music and been the first to introduce electric sound to folklore. Always working beside poets, such as Sappho, Kostas Varnalis and the Greek poet of the seas Kavvadias; its lyrical depth is one of the aspects, which will always be remembered, her minstrel attitude, the freedom of speech and its political views over one of the heaviest cultural heritages from our history.

Young Mariza
Young Mariza

Born March 14, 1944, in Athens by a Greek mother and a German father, member of the army occupation, he was executed by the Nazi forces the very year of her birth. Mariza and her sister Eirini grew up in her mother’s native Thera (Santorini).

From four to nine years old, she grew up in an institution, the widowed mother had problems growing two kids and working alongside. This fact develops a strong bond with her work on itself. Nowadays, she established an own record label (Verso Music) destined to folklore/traditional songs from all over Greece and more specifically, music for children. The experimental music center, Movement & Logos Mariza Koch designed for experimental music teaching only for children has its own choir, plays, books, and cd releases; this is her flag today, an author and educator.

But let us return to our biography

Hippy
Hippy

The time lived in Santorini, founded the roots of its musical expression: the contact with Byzantine music and insular songs. At age 16, she returned to Athens to take music lessons. There, gained contact with the common wave, it’s performers, and debuts commercially in 1967. Two years later, shares an Lp with Nick Chouliaras, based on folk and traditional songs. The year 1970, in Greece, marks the very birth of greek bands singing in greek, Koch’s album ain’t the original first one, but it’s way thicker than other releases from the time, more distant from original folklore.

Based on several traditional regions of Greece, Arabas saw huge commercial success and led her to a large career on different record labels, through the decades.

Mariza: ‘When I started singing was in the era of dictatorship, the very beginning. I wanted to sing an uncensored version from numerous songs, but they all passed through censorship and I can not say exactly what they wanted. So I chose to sing traditional songs that I love very much and I had grown up with them. So the cry of protest is not like before, I took through the text, through the electric instruments and cover versions of songs that I did. It was my personal revolution.’

1976
1976

Soon established as a premier folk singer in her country, instructed by Manos Hadjidakis, she took part in the Eurovision Song 1976 contest, held in Hague, with the song Panagia Mou, Panagia Mou, written by herself, in protest by the Turkish occupation of Cyprus. The coup within the coupled more than 5,000 dead and wounded on and off the isle. (!) The song ends up in 13th place, but its performance, transmitted live through Europe, unleashes her success worldwide.

From that point, she traveled around the globe singing in greatest theaters and recognized music festivals in Western Europe, Russia, Canada, USA, Latin America, Australia, India, Middle East, and Africa as an ambassador of Greek traditional music. Dozens of albums were launched, and over time its aesthetic transformations changed the main proposal of its career: original folklore, from the past with traditional instruments formations (lyres, flutes, and Cretan lyras).

Let’s go to our record:

Today’s record is a bit different, this is for all those who do not resist an acoustic side with strong connections to the traditional folklore. You all will be pleased with a blessed voice, a tuned backing band (bass, drums, guitar, keyboards) and all these beautiful songs and instruments from the Mediterranean!

Eurovision Performance
Eurovision Performance

Mariza’s unique vocals became the centerpiece of the music, which one, more than one occasion needed no accompaniment. Indeed, it’s first solo foray Arabas (Αραμπάς), released in 1971, was a step forward on a greek musical constellation, the first gold album (50.000) in its history! An almost rock album with traditional blends, heavy drums, swing guitar, light fuzz, breakbeats, led by a powerful female voice, who was also a sharp musician and composer, something unusual for the time!

Mariza: ‘Nothing is difficult if it comes from your truth. The difficulties aren’t that will run, as long as it will go, how they establish what you have inside you. For me, it was not difficult this blend, these traditional covers. This sounds like to give and I’m fortunate that he loved and fell in a good time when the audience of my generation understood what was needed. It was a model that was presented as a personal need.’

Live Extasis
Live Extasis

The ‘IM’ highlights are Arabas (Αραμπάς), a mysterious lute introduction unravels a psych melody with hard percussion pace, eerie organs and sweet rhythm guitar, like many others of the album, none of its songs overlaps 4 minutes! And: Smyrna Dance (Σμυρνέϊκος Χορός), an instrumental one, apropos, the unique in that feel on all record, by the way, Smyrna is an ancient city located on the coast of Anatolia, showing us how Greek and Turkish culture can merge, despite the old cultural brawl.

On the back cover, Mariza writes: ‘I started with the desire to keep up with the evolution of our time carrying through my experiences, which are directly associated with the traditional song. So I began an effort to the contemporary expression of traditional song, encouraged by the fact that it always transformed into the tradition.’

Here’s a TV appearance, from 1973, where she sings in a psychedelic scenario, and on its final seconds, her brilliant hippy political view.

Lastly, you can check her astounding performance in Eurovision 76′.

Boa Viagem!

Tracks Include (polytonic, romanized and translated):

A1 Κάτω Απ’ Τη Βροχή / Kato Apo Ti Broxi (Walking in the Rain)

A2 Ο Μέρμηγκας / O Mermigkas (The Big Ant)

A3 Αραμπάς / Arabas (Carriage)

A4 Το Αρμενάκι / To Armenaki (Sailor Boy)

A5 Σαράντα Πήχες Δίμιτο / Saranta Pixes Dimito (Forty Yards of Twill)

A6 Η Λαφίνα / H Lafina (Mother Doe)

B1 Σκέψεις (Χιλιοτσακισμένο) / Skepsis (Thoughts)

B2 Ο Γιάννης / O Giannis (John & Song)

B3 Τσάπ’ Δηλαδή / Tsap Diladi (Tsap)

B4 Τ’ Άστρο Και Το Φεγγαράκι / To Astro Kai To Feggaraki (The Star and The Moon)

B5 Σμυρνέϊκος Χορός / Smirneikos Xoros (Smyrna Dance)

Credits

  • Composed, Adapted: Μαρίζα Κωχ (Mariza Koch)
  • Orchestrated, Conductor: Νίκος Παναγόπουλος (Nick Panagopoulos)

Minos ‎– MSM 139 (Mono) or Minos ‎– ST.MSM 139 (Stereo)

Mariza, Lately
Mariza, Lately