Bubu – Anabelas (1978)

cover

Argentina, as in many other Latin American countries, had a turbulent political context over the 60’s/70’s. With the first coup in 1966, the new junta constantly exchange its presidents, closes the Congress and extinguishes all political parties, trade, and student unions. Due to this regress, massive popular demonstrations such as the Cordobazo/Rosariazo denounced the bad situation of life and lack of rights.

It didn’t take long for urban guerrillas like ERP and the Montoneros arose and began its murders and demands. Amid this turbulence, in 1973, Juan Domingo Perón (Argentina’s most important political figure) returns from an exile of 18 years, being received by millions of people at the Ezeiza airport.

During the occasion, extreme right-wing snipers kill more than 18 people and injure hundreds, in the event that became known as the Ezeiza massacre. (!)

El Cordobazo
El Cordobazo

With his death in 1974, the situation between the left and right parties intensifies, the junta creates the Argentine Anticommunist Alliance (death squad), that along with the Operation Independence stopped a guerrilla attempt to capture and secede the territories of Tucumán. Chaos reigned through the country and the military made a last coup d’état, on 24 March 1976. The military government led by Jorge R. Videla, started one of the bloodiest regimes from the Southern Cone, marked by repression, censorship and (innumerable) disappearances (sic); it also implemented coercive measures in the political, economic and cultural spheres.

Videla & The Junta
Videla & The Junta

Among these was: the hardness of employers over their employees, cultural restrictions such as the prohibition of certain songs and musicians of national and international acts, authoritarian power against the Peronist model, common workers, guerrillas, trade unionists, and intellectuals. Under this dictatorship, youth should belong to a line responsible and committed with patriotism as well as the western lifestyle and Christianity. By contrast, the rock of ’60s had outlined a rebellious young man, with long hair, beard and hippie ideology (free of dogmas).

Perón
Perón

The world in those years lived immersed in a post McCarthyism witch hunt, reflected in the military panorama that was installed throughout Latin America. These functioned as referees control amid the Cold War between East and West.

The Argentine rock, like society as a whole, suffered greater censorship during this period, seen as subversive by the military, in a speech of 1976 Admiral Massera denounced rock musicians and their fans as potential subversives! In the eye of the hurricane, the mid-70s saw the folk and pure rock n’ roll groups lose strength to a new and complex sound: the progressive and symphonic rock. (!)

Bands like Crucis, Espiritu, Contraluz, Alas, El Reloj, La Máquina de Hacer Pájaros and (lastly) Serú Girán inaugurated a new era for Argentine Rock.

Montoneros Symbol
Montoneros Symbol

The rebellious lyrics and criticism of the society through metaphorical and explicit pamphlets relating to love, drugs, and imaginary heroes have been set aside, for unusual concepts and aesthetics that constantly annoyed the regime.

Let’s go to our history:

Bubu was originally formed in 1973 and led by Miguel Zavaleta (singer), characterized by its musical and theatrical proposal, whose tendency is assimilated with progressive or symphonic music of the time. They began performing in public under the name of Sion and debuted in theater Del Globo in 1976, marked by its freshness, joy, and staging. After a series of successful concerts, the band started to record their debut album, but now without the participation of Zavaleta, resulting in difficulties at the beginning, which were overcome by incorporating Patty Guelache.

Bubu Gang
Bubu Gang

Concluding the conceptual work in 1978, with the name of Anabelas, heavily influenced by King Crimson, the band had to wait a few more months until the album release. With the Lp on the streets, the group decides to separate.

Let’s go to our album:

A few months ago when I heard the album for the first time, I could not fail to impress me and ask myself: why i haven’t known this before?! I must confess I’m not a proghead, my favorite acts from Argentine Prog are Serú Girán and La Máquina, but even here we do not notice any resemblance to these bands.

The band touches across many different styles yet imitates no one! The King Crimson influence is mostly through the guitar of Eduardo Rogatti which is Fripp-like in many places and is the closest this band comes to imitation. As Bubu performs driving marches with dramatic vocals and Wagnerian intensity, you can also hear shades of the Canterbury scene from Henry Cow to Soft Machine and Stravinsky!

Argentine Prog Ensemble
Argentine Prog Ensemble

Debuting with only 3 songs, an avant-garde initiative for the standards of the time, once more I won’t highlight any track. Like many other conceptual albums, the whole is more important than an excerpt. Bubu is a band to challenge your listening skills and is a great place to start to get into the more adventurous styles of prog rock.

Nzuri Safari!

Tracks Include:

A1 El Cortejo de Un Día Amarillo (Danza de Las Atlantides / Locomotora Blues)

B1 El Viaje de Anabelas

B2 Sueños de Maniquí

Credits

  • Bass, Effects: Edgardo ‘Fleke’ Folino
  • Drums, Percussion: Edurado ‘Polo’ Corbella
  • Flute (Piccolo, Bass Flute): Cecilia Tenconi
  • Guest, Piano: Mario Kirlis
  • Guitar, Effects: Eduardo Rogatti
  • Lead Vocals: Petty Guelache
  • Chorus: Cecilia XZ, Golo, Manzana, Maqui, Marcelius ‘El Potente’, Voulet
  • Tenor Saxophone: Win Fortsman
  • Violin: Sergio Polizzi
  • Lyrics by: Win Forstman
  • Music, Arrangements by: Daniel Andreoli
  • Sleeve design by: Carlos Felipe Fernández

Notes

‘Así continuó Anabelas su cósmico desplazarse en espiral por los espacios vacíos del sueño. Ondulando entre lo que podríamos decir la conciencia propia y las intersecciones de una realidad que cada tanto la ve aparecer en la fluorescencia de las piedras, en la perfección quimérica de las estructuras móviles del abrazo, o entre silencios que le son absolutamente propios.’

Recorded between March and October of 1978

EMI ‎– 8574

Buenos Aires Overview
Buenos Aires Overview

Alice Coltrane W/ Strings – World Galaxy (1972)

capa cópiaToday’s record has a distinct imprint, something really powerful, different from everything that already appeared here. With a very suggestive name, i invite you all to enter in a spiritual journey led by the surpassing Alice Coltrane, namaste!

Let’s go to our history:

Born and raised in the religious family of Solon and Anne McLeod in Detroit, Michigan, Alice McLeod (August 27, 1937 – January 12, 2007) became interested in music and began her study of the piano at the age of 7. She consistently and diligently practiced and studied classical music. Subsequently, she enrolled in a more advanced study of the music of Rachmaninoff, Beethoven, Stravinsky, and Tchaikovsky.

Alice: ‘Classical music for me, was an extensive, technical study for many years. At that time, I discovered it to be a piece of truly profound music with a highly intellectual ambiance. The classical artist must respectfully recreate the composer’s meaning. Although, with jazz music, you are allowed to develop your own creativity, improvisation, and expression. This greatly inspires me.’ (!)

Heavenly Strings
Heavenly Strings

With a scholarship to the Detroit Institute of Technology, her musical achievements began to echo throughout the city, to the extent that she played in many music halls and churches, for various occasions as weddings, funerals, and religious programs. Her skills and abilities were highly enhanced when she began playing piano and organ for the (gospel) junior and senior choirs at her church.

But her brother, bassist Ernie Farrow, introduced her to jazz early on, and as a teen, she became quite taken with bop and its offshoots. In Detroit, she played piano on sessions with masters like guitarist Kenny Burrell and saxophonist Lucky Thompson. By the early 60’s she was sharing the bandstand with vibes player Terry Gibbs, it was on tour with Gibbs that she met saxophonist John Coltrane.

John & Alice
John & Alice

Their 1965 wedding was the start of a musical union as well. When she replaced pianist McCoy Tyner in the classic Coltrane Quartet there was hubbub in the jazz world. But John Coltrane’s music was unfolding further with every passing month, he had begun probing musical motifs and deep inspiration from the East.

When her husband died in 1967, Alice continued working with members of his last group, including Garrison, saxophonist Pharoah Sanders, and drummer Rashied Ali. She began playing the harp, utilizing sitar and tablas in the ensemble, and turning fully to Eastern cultures for inspiration. Spiritual and colorful, her music morphed into the soundtrack for prayer and meditative techniques. (!)

70's Alice
70’s Alice

Coltrane was a devotee of the Indian guru Sathya Sai Baba, and over the 70’s she established herself into the Vedantic Center, in California, changing his name to Turiya and evolving as a spiritual Hindu guru. Even releasing some albums through the 80’s and 90’s, she decided to diminished their public appearances, and following a 25-year break from major public performances, returning to the stage for three U.S. appearances in the fall of 2006, with a concert for the San Francisco Jazz Festival with her son Ravi, drummer Roy Haynes, and bassist Charlie Haden.

Alice Coltrane died of respiratory failure at West Hills Hospital in LA, aged 69. (RIP)

Alice & Swami Satchidananda
Alice & Swami Satchidananda

Let’s go to our record:

This big lush symphonic beauty must be heard over and over, with no distinction of tracks or highlights, Alice’s music creates his own wash of color and dynamic for the strings to fall like water from the sky into her mix, it shifts and change constantly as the rhythm section responds, in the prism of Coltrane’s textured harpistry.

This set may take some getting used to for some, but it’s easily one of the strongest records Alice Coltrane ever released, and one of the finest moments in 70’s jazz!

Prepare yourself and be ready for the voyage, चांगल्या ट्रिप!

Tracks Include:

A1 My Favorite Things (Rogers – Hammerstein)

A2 Galaxy Around Olodumare

A3 Galaxy In Turiya

B1 Galaxy In Satchidananda

B2 A Love Supreme (Coltrane)

All Galaxys composed by Alice Coltrane

Personnel

  • Alice Coltrane: percussion, piano, organ, harp, tamboura
  • Reggie Workman: bass
  • Ben Riley: drums
  • Elayne Jones: timpani
  • Frank Lowe: saxophone, percussion
  • Swami Satchidananda: voice
  • Leroy Jenkins: solo violin

The String Orchestra

  • David Sackson: concertmaster (all other members, strings)
  • Alan Shulman
  • Arthur Aaron
  • Avron Coleman
  • Edward Green
  • Harry Glickman
  • Henry Aaron
  • Irving Spice
  • Janet Hill
  • Joan Kalisch
  • Julien Barber
  • Ronald Lipscomb
  • Seymour Miroff
  • Thomas Nickerson
  • William Stone

Credits

  • Arranged, Orchestrated, Producer – Alice Coltrane
  • Cover, Design – Peter Max
  • Engineer (Assistant) – Dan Tuberville, Dennis Ferrante
  • Mixed By – Baker Bigsby
  • Mixed At – The Village Recorder (LA)
  • Narrator – Swami Satchidananda (tracks: B1, B2)
  • Photography By – Philip Melnick
  • Producer – Ed Michel
  • Recorded By – Tom Flye
  • Recorded At – Record Plant, NYC

Recorded November 15 and 16, 1971, at The Record Plant (NYC)

Impulse AS-9218

Alice's Lastly Portrait
Alice’s Lastly Portrait