Mina – Mina Canta o Brasil (1970)

folder cópiaMina is the greatest Italian singer of all times, but not only. For Italians, Mina is an icon equally as important as the biggest and best-known names about which they boast as proof that Italy has the highest quality everything in the world, like Ferrari, Armani, Fellini or Antonioni. During the ’60s and the ’70s, Mina embodied the very essence of the ultra-talented superstar on stage, in TV and in her records. (!)

She sang Italy’s greatest hits, which for over 40 years have been the leitmotiv of the everyday life of the Italian people. Nowadays Mina releases one record a year.

Let’s go to our artist:

Anna Maria Quaini or Mina Mazzini (25 March 1940)known for her three-octave vocal range, the agility of her soprano voice, and its image as an emancipated woman. In performance, Mina combined several modern styles with traditional Italian melodies which made her the most versatile pop singer in Italian music.

19 Year Old 'Rocker'
19 Year Old ‘Rocker’

Mina dominated the Italian charts for fifteen years and reached an unsurpassed level of popularity in Italy. She has scored 77 albums and 71 singles on the Italian charts!

Mina’s TV appearances in 1959 were the first for a female rock and roll singer in Italy, the public at the timelabeled her as the Tiger of Cremona for her wild gestures and body shakes. When she turned to light pop tunes, Mina’s chart-toppers in West Germany in 1962 and Japan in 1964 earned her the title of the best international artist. Mina’s more refined sensual manner was introduced in 1960 with Gino Paoli‘s ballad This World We Love In’, entering on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1961.

Mina & Massimiliano Pani
Mina & Massimiliano Pani

Mina was banned from Italian TV and radio in 1963 because her pregnancy and relationship with the married actor Corrado Pani did not accord with the dominant Catholic and bourgeois morals (sic). After the ban, RAI tried to continue to prohibit her songs, which were forthright in dealing with subjects such as religion, smoking, and sex. Mina’s school act combined sex appeal, with public smoking, dyed blond hair, and shaved eyebrows to create an (unprecedented) bad girl image!

Mina’s voice has a distinctive timbre and great power, her main themes are anguished love stories performed in high dramatic tones. The singer combined classic Italian pop with elements of blues, R&B and soul music during the late ’60s, especially when she worked in collaboration with the singer-songwriter Lucio Battisti.

Live
Live

Top Italian songwriters created material with large vocal ranges and unusual chord progressions to showcase her singing skills, particularly ‘Brava’ (Bruno Canfora) and the pseudo-serial ‘Se Telefonando’ (Ennio Morricone)Shirley Bassey carried Mina’s ballad Grande Grande Grande’ to charts in the U.S. and U.K. in 1973.

Mina’s easy listening duet Parole Parole’ was turned into a worldwide hit by Dalida and Alain Delon in 1974. Then, Mina suddenly gave up public appearances in 1978 but has continued to release popular albums on a yearly basis to the present day.

Let’s go to our album:

Mina is an eclectic, versatile artist completely at ease with a repertoire spanning all musical genres, all of which she has sung with masterful panache!

The Tiger of Cremona!
La Tigre di Cremona!

By 1970 Mina was already an established star, flirting with Brazilian music since the mid-’60s, passing through bossa nova and samba, here she relies on the amazing arrangements of maestro Augusto Martelli to bring a vigorous overview of the so-called MPB (Brazilian popular music). With a stellar team of composers, Mina sings with wild passion, splendid technique and darting Portuguese to our delight!

The ‘IM’ highlights are Todas as Mulheres do Mundo and Tem Mais Samba.

Приятной поездки!

Tracks Include:

A1 Canto de Ossanha (B. Powell, V. de Moraes)

A2 Com Acúcar, Com Afeto (C. Buarque de Hollanda)

A3 Upa Nequinho (E. Lobo, G. Guarnieri)

A4 Todas as Mulheres do Mundo (Erasmo Carlos)

A5 Que Maravilha (Jorge Ben, Toquinho)

A6 A Banda (C. Buarque de Hollanda)

B1 Canção Latina (O. Stocker, V. Martins)

B2 Tem Mais Samba (C. Buarque de Hollanda)

B3 Sentado a Beira do Caminho (E. Carlos, R. Carlos)

B4 A Praça (Carlos Imperial)

B5 Nem Vem Que Não Tem (Carlos Imperial)

Credits

Arranged, Conductor (Orchestra): Bob Mitchell (Augusto Martelli)

PDU ‎– Pld.A.5026

Today
Today

‘If I didn’t have my own voice, I’d like to have the voice of a young Italian girl named Mina’ / Sarah Vaughan, 1968. (!)

Abílio Manoel – Compacto Duplo (1974)

capa cópia

Abilio Manuel Robalo Pedro (Lisboa, February 3, 1947 – Itacaré, June 30, 2010) was a singer, composer, and music producer. Portuguese settled in Brazil since he was seven years old, Abílio also worked as a radio broadcaster, advertising person, film director, audio operator and composer of jingles and soundtracks.

Let’s go to their history:

Brazil. He started his career in 1966, preparing himself to join the Physics course. The first performance took place at the program Show do Meio Dia, presented by Pagano Sobrinho on TV Excelsior. In 1967 he entered to University of São Paulo and, while studying physics, he used to perform in concerts promoted at the university campus.

That year, came an invitation to represent the USP on the first Festival Latino-América de la Canción Universitaria placed in Santiago, Chile. He won the award for best composer, thanks to the song Minha Rua. This presentation brought him the first contract with Odeon, who would record the following year, their first Lp, with musical direction by Milton Miranda and arrangements by Edmundo Peruzzi.

Newspaper Article
Newspaper Article

In 1968, he competed at the TV Excelsior festival with the song Quem Dera and in the Festival Internacional da Canção with Catavento. After the I Festival Universitário from TV Tupi, he participated with Samba de Roda and Tudo Bem, included on its first single. In 1969, won the II Festival Universitário, still on Tupi, with Pena Verde, perhaps his greatest success, whose single, reached the top of the charts in 1970, making it known throughout the country and Latin America!

He released its second Lp (Pena Verde), in 1970, making television appearances and concerts in Mexico, where he still recorded a compact. During the ’70s launches four more Lp’s and several singles. In 1977 began working at Radio Bandeirantes from São Paulo. In 1980 he composed the soundtrack to Pixote, directed by Hector Babenco. Its last album, Curso das Águas, came out in 1983, by RCA Victor.

70's Pomo
70’s Pomo

The year 1984 started with Abílio presenting the program América do Sol, on Radio USP in São Paulo. As a producer, he was responsible for launching the homonymous collection, by Band and Copacabana labels. From 1997 he devoted to making advertising jingles, soundtracks and promoting many artistic events. After decades of hiatus, he was preparing to return his artistic career, when he had a heart attack during the 2010 World Cup. He was holidaying in Bahia at the time. (RIP)

Let’s go to our album:

Even not being his most ardent fan, today’s record shows us, with only four songs, all the quality behind this unfamiliar author. Slightly recognized even in Brazil, Abílio’s music has a perfect blend between samba, rock, and folk.

Once more, Brazilian arrangers are over the regular, with exquisite horns, reeds and a whole context of scholar and pop music. With shiny moods that go from the yearning to funny, like Luiza Manequim, a spectacular horn-samba! And Tudo Azul N’América do Sul a satirical view about the early 70’s Rio: on one side the military terror (persecution, torture, and death), on another, the sea, clear skies, and blazing sun.

Portrait
Portrait

The alienation lyrics that music (falsely) proposes, talk directly with Pilantragem, a musical movement from the same epoch, led by Carlos Imperial and Wilson Simonalwho preached always to look to the ‘good’ side of the life, though, with selfish, consumerist and sexist values (sic). Ona Bidaia!

Tracks Include:

A1 Pena Verde (Feat. Rosa Rebelo) /// 1969

A2 Luiza Manequim /// 1971

B1 Andréa /// 1970

B2 Tudo Azul N’America do Sul /// 1971

Music and lyrics: Abílio Manoel (except B2 ~ Abílio Manoel – Carvalho)

Double Compact, Odeon S7-BD 1297

No credit to the musicians and arrangers.

Douro River, Portugal
Douro River, Portugal

Novos Bahianos + Baby Consuelo – No Final do Juízo (1971)

capa cópia

Brazil, 1969. After the infamous AI-5 (institutional act #5), the dictatorship that was ruling entered in a new phase, seeing its 5th birthday, with an urban guerrilla and a mass wave of protests throughout the country. The most reactionary group made a coup inside the coup. From that moment the previous censorship was installed on every layer of the society, no civil guaranties at all, any manifestation was a subversive act, elections/congress suspended, as the unions and student leadership.

The terror against anyone contrary to the order was real. Many people were persecuted, arrested, tortured, killed and buried as indigents under the iron tutelage of the State, and the connivance from big entrepreneurs, media groups, multinational companies, industrial bourgeoisie and CIA (Torture expertise). (!)

100.000 March, 1968
100.000 March 1968

The only thing that this tropical, multicultural and joyful society could vote and participate, was the emblematic Festivais (music festivals), liberated by the junta. Created in 1965, aired and transmitted live by multiple broadcasters, always held by the end of the year, it was the greatest musical event from the time; eagerly awaited, with mass media coverage, the crowds could boo and cheered to death in a collective catharsis, revealing new national superstars or villains!

Renowned artist like Elis Regina, Geraldo Vandré, Edu Lobo, Nara Leão, Chico Buarque, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, Gal Costa, Tom Zé, and many others was revealed there. However, due to the turbulent development in 1968 festival, the dictatorship decided to prune and systematize the spectacle. There was a strict preoccupation to show an ordained happily country to the world, the festival would be transmitted on early January to Europe, via Rede Globo (sic), in a 3-hour special.

At the end of the year, most mentioned artists were exiled by solidarity or not, Tropicalism was dead, Marighella too; inside this turbulent musical void, Os Novos Bahianos (first graphed with H, after without) emerged and caused a fuss.

Early Promo
Early Promo

Let’s go to their history:

It all started at Vila Velha theater (Salvador, Bahia) with the show ‘O Desembarque dos Bichos Depois do Dilúvio Universal’. The members: Luiz Dias Galvão, agronomist, poet, musician, cinema and dramatics enthusiast, 32 years; Antônio Carlos de Morais Pires, 21 years of fiery musical essay at Turiassu, interior of Bahia; Paulo Roberto de Figueiredo, ex-crooner from Orquestra Avanço, 23 years, nicknamed Paulinho Boca de Cantor; Bernadete Dinorah de Carvalho (Baby), from Niterói (Rio de Janeiro), newcomer to Salvador, which commemorate his seventeen years living under the bridge (!); lastly, Jorginho, Carlinhos, Lico e Pedro Anibal de Oliveira Gomes (Pepeu) that formed the backing band, Os Leif’s. With the exception of Bernadette, they were all from Bahia, unheard, strange, radicals and young.

It was the beginning of Novos Baianos, at the tropical chaos of 1969.

Baby, carioca problem-girl, dreamed, like many in its age, being an artist, a singer, the one who deserves posters with your initials. Her baptism name didn’t help too. In an impetus of boredom and freedom, she goes with her friend, Ediane, to Salvador, there she meets Galvão and Moraes at Brasa’s, a unique bar from there. Paulinho (boca de cantor) also met the triad and joins them at Dona Maritó boarding house. The only one with previous musical experience (live shows and recording), were Pepeu (guitar), owner of an unmistakable style, genuinely Brazilian, crossing Hendrix with Choro. (!!)

1970
1970

In the beginning, only a quartet: Moraes, Galvão, Paulinho e Baby (whose new name was born and celebrated from a movie character) which was accompanied by Leif’s. Galvão was the poet and mentor, Moraes the main composer, Galvão’s partner, with a subtle acoustic guitar. Paulinho was the rascal, Lúcifer, and mellow singer. Pepeu the guitar hero. Baby the stoned singer. All, with a Tropicalia pinch in 1969/70.

After the racket from Dilúvio in Salvador, they went to São Paulo, were performed in numerous TV shows always exceeding the expected number of songs and staging absurd expedients. The first manager was Marcos Lázaro, through João Araújo (manager of Gil, Caetano, Gal) they signed with RGE and release their first single:

Yet in 1969: De Vera /// Colégio de Aplicação.

Then in 1970, a caustic, sardonic, threatening Lp (Ferro Na Boneca – RGE) which included tracks from the compact, a cornucopia of styles/titles. They also participate as actors and on the soundtrack from two Underground (Marginal) films of the era: Meteorango Kid e Caveira My Friend. Still, they released a double compact without Baby, who was trying her first steps on a solo foray.

These early albums will have dedicated posts in the near future!

Fun!
Fun!

Let’s go to our record:

Today’s album is an incredible double compact, never re-released on Cd, forgotten and hated by the band due to technical aspects. It was the one and only attempt on Phillips, at the time directed by the mighty Nelson MottaOne thing that must be said, was the radical transformation that the band went through after meeting with João Gilberto, he also lived with them for a short period at the infamous apartment in Botafogo. The roots, that were until then based in various styles, such as, rock, baião, soul, tango, turned into samba and choro strictly.

This little revolution happened in late 1971, and it’s well counted in the documentary Filhos de João. So this is their last release without the sound that would be recognized and praised not only in Brazil but worldwide!

Psychedelic Novos
Psychedelic Novos

We go from hippy folk to a Latin brass experience (even sung in Spanish!), passing through some sambas and harsh fuzz rocks sang in an over the top registry by Baby! Special mention lyrics go for Dê um Rolê, a counterculture hymn, that became very (very!) famous on the interpretation of Gal Costa, the song preaches love from head to toe, going completely against the terror that was represented by the military.

Please enjoy this little gem and Jó Utat!

Tracks Include:

Novos Bahianos + Baby Consuelo – No Final do Juízo (1971)

A1 Dê Um Rolê (Moraes Moreira / Galvão) ~ Paulinho Boca de Cantor

A2 Você Me Dá Um Disco? (Moraes Moreira / Pepeu Gomes / Galvão) ~ Baby do Brasil

B1 Caminho de Pedro (Moraes Moreira / Galvão) ~ Moraes Moreira

B2 Risque (Moraes Moreira / Galvão) ~ Moraes Moreira e Baby do Brasil

Credits

Production Director: Nelson Motta

Photo: David Drew Zingg

Compacto Duplo – Philips 6245 003

Rio Curves
Rio Curves